Tyson Ross among interesting new free agents following non-tender deadline

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Friday at 8 p.m. ET marked the deadline for teams to tender a contract to arbitration-eligible players. By tendering a contract, the team maintains control of the player and has an opportunity to reach a deal with the player in arbitration if a contract can’t be worked out otherwise. Not tendering a contract means the player immediately becomes a free agent eligible to sign with any team.

Such decisions typically revolve around established players who have worked their way up the pay scale, but may not be seen as worth the money. In other instances, teams are simply looking to cut payroll and non-tendering gives them any easy out.

Usually, this process doesn’t lead to any truly huge names becoming available. However, this year’s list does have some very interesting names, including a potential difference-making pitcher. With that in mind, we’ll take a quick look at the four most interesting players who are now free agents and who are likely to draw some serious interest.

Tyson Ross is an intriguing new free agent after being non-tendered by the Padres. (AP)
Tyson Ross is an intriguing new free agent after being non-tendered by the Padres. (AP)

Tyson Ross — San Diego Padres

This was the shocker of the day. The Padres non-tendered the most players overall with five. They also non-tendered the most prominent in 29-year-old right-hander Tyson Ross.

Ross, who served as the Padres ace in 2015, made just one start in 2016 before he was shut down for the season with a shoulder issue. He ultimately required surgery in October for thoracic outlet syndrome, which undoubtedly contributed to the Padres decision. His status for opening day is clearly in question, but there’s enough upside here that he seemed to be worth waiting for to see if he could start healthy and rebuild his value.

At this time last year, Ross was atop the list of trade targets for teams needing a pitcher. After the Padres held tight throughout the winter, Ross was expected to be among the biggest names discussed at the trade deadline. Obviously that didn’t materialize either due to his health. Point being, it’s amazing to see just how much Ross’ value to the Padres declined in 12 months.

Rest assured though, Ross will land on his feet. Over seven seasons, he’s posted a 3.64 ERA and proven that when healthy, he can make an impact.

Ben Revere ends a disappointing tenure with the Nationals. (AP)
Ben Revere ends a disappointing tenure with the Nationals. (AP)

Ben Revere — Washington Nationals

The Washington Nationals helped clear an outfield logjam (that could soon include Andrew McCutchen) by non-tendering Ben Revere.

The move had been expected all offseason, but came into clearler focus as rumors circulated around McCutchen and other outfielders the Nationals have interest in targeting. Revere’s time in Washington was simply over after a season plagued by injuries and dismal production. In 103 games, Revere hit just .217/.260/.300 with two homers and 24 RBIs.

Still just 28, Revere does set up as a strong bounceback candidate and a potentially solid bargain for a team needing an outfielder. To keep him healthy, the signing team should consider a move to left field. Above that though, they should feel pretty confident signing a player who hit an impressive 303/.334/.360 between 2013 and 2015.

Chris Carter will take his immense power elsewhere in 2017. (AP)
Chris Carter will take his immense power elsewhere in 2017. (AP)

Chris Carter — Milwaukee Brewers

Milwaukee made its decision on Carter on Monday, not long before agreeing to a three-year deal with Eric Thames to serve as their new first baseman. It was a little surprising at first, seeing as Carter just finished as the National League co-leader in home runs with 41. However, he did only hit .222, and he’s come to be known as a strikeout machine after going down on strikes 751 times over the last four seasons.

Carter is in his second year of arbitration after earning an affordable $2.5M last season. He was expected to command $9-$10M in arbitration this winter, but may earn more on a one- or two-year deal this winter as teams look for a first-base power source.

If healthy, ground ball specialist Seth Maness will make a nice addition to someone's bullpen. (AP)
If healthy, ground ball specialist Seth Maness will make a nice addition to someone’s bullpen. (AP)

Seth Maness — St. Louis Cardinals

As we noted, there aren’t a lot of household names on this list, but there are definitely contributors. Assuming he proves healthy, Maness should be just that for his next employer.

Over the last four seasons, Maness has proven to be a stabilizing force. In 237 1/3 career innings, he’s posted a 3.19 ERA to go along with 17 wins and seven saves. He’s recognized as a ground ball specialist, which is why manager Mike Matheny would go to him when the team needed a double play.

Unfortunately, his status for the beginning of 2017 is in question after he required UCL surgery in August. It was not a full ligament replacement, but there are obviously concerns about his ability to contribute in the short-term. He’s well worth taking a flier on though and we’re sure teams will line up hoping for a bargain.

Here’s a complete list of non-tendered players.

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Mark Townsend is a writer for Big League Stew on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at bigleaguestew@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter!