Premature Bowl: Rodgers, Brady on collision course for 'Super' finale

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Here's the season stat line for Aaron Rodgers: 67-of-91 passing (73.6 percent), 771 yards total (8.5 per attempt), 10 touchdowns, zero interceptions and a QB rating of 135.4.

Here's the season stat line for Tom Brady: 96-of-133 (72.2 percent), 1,112 yards total (8.4 per attempt), nine touchdowns, zero interceptions and a QB rating of 119.6.

Aaron Rodgers (C) threw 5 TD passes in Monday night's win over the Chiefs. (Getty)
Aaron Rodgers (C) threw 5 TD passes in Monday night's win over the Chiefs. (Getty)

And, of course, both Rodgers' Green Bay Packers and Brady's New England Patriots are 3-0. The combined average margin of victory is 12.8, which isn't even reflective of how dominant the two teams have been.

The NFL is a league of overreaction. The entire sport is based on this overreaction, a week between games for victories to leave everyone dreaming of Lombardi trophies and losses to be viewed in sky-is-falling misery.

You can curse it or enjoy it or, in this case, try a three-week overreaction based on the quarterbacks mentioned above.

Rodgers and Brady are playing the position about as well as it can conceivably be played. Their teams are rolling through early competition. As such, it should surprise no one if we wind up with Packers-Patriots for Super Bowl 50 in the Bay Area, boyhood home to Brady, college one of Rodgers.

Look, we get it, it's still September, so here are all your caveats. It's early. Injuries happen. Teams get better and worse. Upsets occur. Reaching a Super Bowl is hard. You need some luck. You need a hands team that won't botch an on-sides kick.

In the NFC a fully operational Seattle still looms. So does a healthy Dallas. Arizona and Atlanta and Carolina are all 3-0 also. In the AFC, well, Peyton Manning might stay healthy through January and there is Andy Dalton's Cincinnati and … OK, let's just leave it at that.

"It's nice to be 3-0, but big deal," New England coach Bill Belichick said Monday. "Three wins isn’t going to get anything in this league, I'll tell you that. It will probably just get a lot of coaches fired."

There you go, Belichick and Mike McCarthy could conceivably lose out and find themselves on the hot seat.

Sometimes there are caveats to the caveats.

Realistically though, Green Bay and New England are on a steamroller collision course for Levi's Stadium and while there is no doubt a lot of people are tired of these two winning and winning, it would be fitting in a historical context for Brady and Rodgers to square off with everything on the line.

The NFL has been blessed with Brady and Manning matching up almost annually despite no longer being in the same division – they should meet for the 17th time on Nov. 29th. That includes four playoff games.

No such luck for Brady vs. Rodgers. There is essentially just one matchup, Green Bay’s 26-21 victory last year in Lambeau (each guy threw for a couple touchdowns in what many thought was a Super Bowl preview).

In 2006, the Pats won 35-0, a game that included Brett Favre getting injured courtesy of a Tedy Bruschi sack. Rodgers, then in his second year out of Cal, was forced into action, just his fourth NFL game. He went 4-for-12 and almost no one noticed. The game was such a blowout, Vinny Testaverde subbed in late for Brady.

Right now the two are putting on a masters class on how to play the position: Two veterans, past Super Bowl champs, MVPs and future Hall of Famers in complete command of not just their offenses, but their entire organization. It's almost impossible to imagine either team without their quarterback.

"His ability to really process information is as good as I've ever been around," McCarthy said of Rodgers after he threw five touchdowns in Monday's 38-28 victory over Kansas City. "His ability to see not only what's going on their sideline, watching their communication, their non-verbal communication, their verbal communication, picking up tendencies throughout the game, able to apply it to future plays and future situations is very unique.

"I think it speaks volumes to him in his preparation, knowledge, experience," McCarthy continued. "… [H]e's playing at a great level."

Belichick isn't much for such effusive praise, even of Brady, but after a 51-17 drubbing of Jacksonville on Sunday which saw all nine Brady-led drives result in points, he did give a nod toward being impressed.

"Offensively, that's about as much consistency and production as you can have, score every time you have the ball," Belichick said. "There were a lot of good things there."

What the two of them are doing right now is pushing into all-timer territory. The accuracy, both above 72 percent, is absurd and causes defenses to struggle to cover. Thanks to Brady's quick release and Rodgers' even quicker feet, counting on the pass rush to rattle them isn't advised either.

It's mostly pick your poison and watch the show.

Rodgers lost his favorite target, Jordy Nelson, to a preseason injury and hasn't skipped a beat. Brady has, for years, juggled in guys – he was great with a burner wideout in Randy Moss, undersized underneath receivers such as Wes Welker and Julian Edelman, and bruising tight ends in Aaron Hernandez and Rob Gronkowski.

Aaron Rodgers is 1-0 against Tom Brady. (AP)
Aaron Rodgers is 1-0 against Tom Brady. (AP)

With the exception of maybe at Denver, New England should be favored in every remaining game, home and away. The same is probably true for Green Bay, although there are trips to Carolina and Arizona.

In Green Bay, it's Super Bowl or bust, a delayed but deserved trip after last season's NFC championship game collapse to Seattle. If not for that, a Brady-Rodgers Super Bowl would've gone down last season.

In Foxborough, there is never any other acceptable destination, especially after an offseason where the team, and Brady in particular, scrapped with commissioner Roger Goodell. Already there is talk about another perfect regular season, à la 2007 after the spygate scandal seemed to push the team into screw-the-league mode

"I can't understand that one quite yet," Brady told WEEI on Monday. "It's three games into the year. There's so much football left."

Of course there is, but so far no one else is close to playing as well as these two QBs and the teams they lead. If they are staring at each other from opposite sidelines in Santa Clara in February, no one will be surprised.

Caveats be damned.

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