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Daniel and Henrik Sedin had a true Hall of Fame partnership

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It turns out the 2022 Hockey Hall of Fame class will be, in many ways, a celebration of the Vancouver Canucks of the late 2000s and early 2010s.

Some folks have their backs up about that, which is somewhat understandable given the taste of underachievement that still lingers when discussing a team that won five straight division titles and two Presidents' Trophies, but lost in its only appearance in the Stanley Cup Final.

The Hockey Hall of Fame, though, it isn't just about one thing. Which is important to remember with this latest class.

The Sedin twins were fittingly voted into the Hall of Fame together. (Bob Frid-USA TODAY Sports)
The Sedin twins were fittingly voted into the Hall of Fame together. (Bob Frid-USA TODAY Sports)

Roberto Luongo is living and soon-to-be-enshrined proof of that, existing on the shortlist of great goaltenders in the history of the sport without having won a Stanley Cup. But he has the fourth-most wins in history, and was in net for the winning team in one of the most meaningful and lasting moments in hockey history at the 2010 Winter Olympics in, fittingly, Vancouver. He deserves first-ballot status as much as anyone.

Though they are Olympic champions and brilliant talents in their own right, it requires a little more interpretation when using the same argument for Daniel and Henrik Sedin, or the other two Canucks legends called to the Hall.

These are players that transcended the game like many of the others celebrated inside hockey's hallowed grounds. They had brilliant individual numbers and spearheaded team success. They had many wonderful moments on the international stage, and are ambassadors for the sport. They were each consummate professionals.

What's different about them is that their success is shared, almost exclusively. They did separate themselves, albeit somewhat symmetrically, with Henrik capturing the Hart and Art Ross trophies in 2010 and Daniel nabbing the Art Ross and Ted Lindsay award the following season.

But what was remarkable — and what we'll undoubtedly remember — about the Sedin twins is what they did together. Which means it was less about Hart trophies or individual honours, and more about the beauty of an undeniable connection.

This was the truest partnership in the history of the league, and one borne, of course, from kinship. Naturally one was the shooter, and the other the playmaker. They finished with near-identical point totals and per-game production rates, surpassing the 1,000-point thresholds just a few playing months apart. Their career arcs matched the rise and eventual decline of the Canucks.

What the Sedins aren't are individuals who so clearly can stand on their own, which is in many ways what the Hockey Hall of Fame is about.

Henrik and Daniel rank 67th and 76th in league history in total points and both sneak inside the top 200 in points per game for their careers. Though 1,000 points is a critical benchmark, 51 previous entrants into the Hockey Hall of Fame have at least 1,100. Others not selected as first-ballot Hall of Famers, including fellow 2022 class member Daniel Alfredsson, and others still waiting on a call, including Rod Brind'Amour and Jeremy Roenick, finished with more points in their careers.

If forced to travel their own unique paths, it's worth wondering what would have come from the careers of Henrik and Daniel, and if they could have carved out Hall of Fame status.

But the Sedins' story is uniquely theirs, and not subject to whataboutism. Brian Burke did manage to pair them together on draft night, forever altering the history of the Canucks franchise as well as the league as a whole, and allowing them to achieve and even surpass their immense potentials.

Henrik and Daniel deserve their place in hockey for what they accomplished as individuals, in tandem, and for their role in helping evolve the game into something better than it was prior to their arrivals.

And because the Hockey Hall of Fame isn't about just one thing, we can celebrate its one true Hall of Fame partnership.

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