Myles Nash on the move to tight end

Bobby Deren, Editor
Scarlet Nation
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Spring practice started a bit differently for Rutgers fifth-year senior Myles Nash this year. After spending the last few years at defensive end, Nash has made the switch to tight end.

“I like the transition, I am just trying to be a sponge and learn in the meeting room as much as I can,” Nash told Scarlet Nation after Saturday’s practice. “Ultimately, if I stay here or move back to defense, I think it will help me; juts learning the concepts of the offense. I feel like that will help me going back to defense.”

Nash was moved to build depth at what is a razor thin tight end position, although there is still the chance he could be back on defense when the season begins.

“I really just try not to think about it," Nash said. “[Head] Coach [Chris] Ash did not force me to make this move. He basically told me I was the only other guy on the team that could make this move. So I called him and told him the next day, I would be more than happy to help the team. I just try to keep my head down and keep working. I am only thinking about winning games.”

And how has Nash fared thus far at tight end?

“The first week and half, it was getting the signals down and learning the different plays and terminology,” Nash said. “It was difficult at first, but it is starting to come on more to me now technique wise.”

Nash played quarterback in high school on the offensive side of the football, so he does not have a wealth of experience catching the football.

“The last time I caught a pass was in my high school championship game my senior year in high school,” Nash said. “I played receiver for like one snap. They just threw it just because we could do it. We were blowing them out and just having fun at that point. Playing at Timber Creek, not a lot of games are close.

“But I had to adjust to catching the ball with the speed of the game. Each practice, I have gained more confidence catching the ball. I am not really worried about that. Athletically, I feel like I can fit into this position and I like the way I am catching the ball right now.”

From a physical standpoint, Nash looks the part of a physical, athletic college tight end.

“I am around 252 [pounds]. I played the season last year around 260 and I had a lot of bad weight,” Nash said. “They didn’t like how fast I put it on, so I came back maybe around like 244, shredded a lot of weight and tried to get my body fat down. I will ultimately probably play at that 260-range this season whether I am on offense or defense. But I want to make sure I put it on the right way so I maintain my speed.”

Through the first half of spring practice, reports are favorable in regards to Nash’s position change.

“He has done a nice job. I have no reservations, he is getting better each day,” tight ends coach Vince Okruch said of Nash on Saturday. “It is a little bit foreign to him, having been on defense for so long, but he has been a pleasant addition.”

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