Cubs World Series tickets have reached Super Bowl levels

How much would you pay for a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity? That’s what Chicago Cubs fans have to determine as their favorite team makes its first World Series appearance in 71 years. Given the historic nature of the event, prices are expected to be sky high.

Well, those prices are in, and going to a World Series game in Chicago is pretty much on par with attending a recent Super Bowl. Here’s the average resale price for each World Series game, according to SeatGeek.

Game 1: (In Cleveland): $1,156
Game 2: (In Cleveland): $1,122
Game 3: (In Chicago): $3,372
Game 4: (In Chicago): $4,018
Game 5: (In Chicago): $4,451
Game 6: (In Cleveland): $1,356
Game 7: (In Cleveland): $1,681

If they hold, those figures would make this World Series the most expensive in recent memory.

Cubs/Indians World Series tickets are going to cost you. (Chart courtesy of SeatGeek)
Cubs/Indians World Series tickets are going to cost you. (Chart courtesy of SeatGeek)

So, yeah, if you’re looking to attend one of the three games in Chicago, it’s going to cost you about as much as a recent Super Bowl ticket. The only event SeatGeek has seen with a higher average resale value was the Mayweather-Pacquiao fight.

Of course, tickets for the games in Cleveland are nothing to laugh about either. As of right now, Cleveland Indians’ tickets will likely be the most expensive event in Cleveland that SeatGeek has ever tracked. Yep, even more expensive than NBA Finals tickets during the Cleveland Cavaliers’ run the past two seasons. By comparison, the average Cavs Finals ticket cost $1,002. Indians’ tickets would beat that figure by a couple hundred bucks.

Getting tickets to a World Series game at Wrigley Field is going to cost you. (Getty Images/Dylan Buell)
Getting tickets to a World Series game at Wrigley Field is going to cost you. (Getty Images/Dylan Buell)

Now, the wise Cubs fan might look at the above list and conclude it would be much easier on their wallet to try and attend a game in Cleveland. That’s been the case, according to SeatGeek. Since Friday, 21 percent of fans who have looked at Game 1 or Game 2 tickets have lived in Illinois. As a comparison, 37 percent of fans who have looked at those contests have lived in Ohio.

That’s probably to be expected. If your favorite team was trying to break a 108-year championship drought, you would be willing to drive six hours to see it.

That depends, of course, on whether you can afford it in the first place. Cubs fans may need to swear off Malört and deep dish pizza for the rest of their lives in order to balance their suddenly barren bank accounts. Given what’s at stake here, that seems like an easy tradeoff.

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Chris Cwik is a writer for Big League Stew on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at christophercwik@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter! Follow @Chris_Cwik