Antonio Callaway deemed not responsible in conduct hearing

Nick Bromberg
Dr. Saturday
ATLANTA, GA – DECEMBER 5: <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="/ncaaf/players/255010/" data-ylk="slk:Antonio Callaway">Antonio Callaway</a> #81 of the <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="/ncaab/teams/fak/" data-ylk="slk:Florida Gators">Florida Gators</a> returns a punt for a second quarter touchdown against the <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="/ncaab/teams/aaf/" data-ylk="slk:Alabama Crimson Tide">Alabama Crimson Tide</a> during the SEC Championship at the Georgia Dome on December 5, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA – DECEMBER 5: Antonio Callaway #81 of the Florida Gators returns a punt for a second quarter touchdown against the Alabama Crimson Tide during the SEC Championship at the Georgia Dome on December 5, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images)

A conduct hearing against Florida wide receiver Antonio Callaway has gone in his favor.

Callaway, recently reinstated to the team for practices, faced a conduct hearing regarding a sexual assault allegation. The allegation was levied against him and former Florida quarterback Treon Harris, who transferred.

According to the arbiter in the case, Callaway wasn’t deemed responsible for “conduct causing physical injury, sexual assault and sexual misconduct” per the Tampa Bay Times. Callaway’s countercomplaint against his accuser is still unresolved.

Schickel’s letter said that the complainant was not intoxicated and that her text messages from that evening were “inconsistent.” Schickel wrote that Callaway admitted to being high on marijuana and said that the complainant “was the aggressor” in the incident.

The attorney for Callaway’s accuser, John Clune, said his client would not be attending a hearing earlier in the month because the arbiter, Jake Schickel, was a donor to the Florida football and basketball programs.

“It wasn’t exactly a news flash that Mr. Callaway was going to be found not responsible,” Clune told the Tampa Bay Times. “It just seems like this whole situation, ever since we found out they were having a booster hear the case, is a disgrace, and it’s a disservice to everybody who is involved in this process.”

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Florida defended Schickel’s appointment and said all hearing officers “are trained and vetted for their impartiality. Clune also represented the woman who accused former Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston in her complaint against the quarterback.

Callaway’s attorney has also fired back against Clune and his post-ruling statement included a paragraph stating “the young lady’s advisor has said, “they take their witnesses and go elsewhere.” They need to be careful what they wish for.”

Callaway was Florida’s leading receiver in 2015 with 678 receiving yards. He also returned a punt for a touchdown against Alabama in the SEC Championship Game.

Harris’ transfer was part of a deal regarding the accusations. He reportedly apologized to the woman as part of his agreement with Florida.

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Nick Bromberg is the assistant editor of Dr. Saturday on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at nickbromberg@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter!

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