Alexander banned at least a year, Landry indefinitely

AFP
Carolina Panthers defensive end Frank Alexander, pictured on May 12, 2012, was suspended by the NFL for a minimum of one year without pay (AFP Photo/Brian A. Westerholt)

Carolina Panthers defensive end Frank Alexander, pictured on May 12, 2012, was suspended by the NFL for a minimum of one year without pay

Carolina Panthers defensive end Frank Alexander, pictured on May 12, 2012, was suspended by the NFL for a minimum of one year without pay (AFP Photo/Brian A. Westerholt)

New York (AFP) - Carolina Panthers defensive end Frank Alexander was suspended by the NFL for a minimum of one year without pay Tuesday while free agent safety LaRon Landry was issued an indefinite ban.

The Panthers announced Alexander's ban, the third on a Carolina player this week, for his third violation of the NFL's substance abuse policy.

Landry's punishment, confirmed by the NFL's website, was for his third violation of the league's performance-enhancing drug policy, according to ESPN.

Alexander, who is on injured reserve this season, was suspended twice last season for substance abuse violations.

He joins fellow Panthers Stephen Hill, a receiver also on the injured list who was hit with a one-game substance abuse policy violation, and defensive end Wes Horton, who was suspended four games for a performance-enhancing substance violation.

Horton was set to be replaced this week as Charles Johnson returned from the injured list for the Panthers, who take a 10-0 record into a Thursday matchup at Dallas.

Landry, selected sixth overall in the 2007 NFL Draft, played for the Washington Redskins, New York Jets and Indianapolis Colts, who released him last March.

Landry was suspended for four games last season for a performance-enhancing drugs ban and after his release by the Colts was handed a 10-game ban for another performance-enhancing substance violation. He had just completed serving that 10-game suspension when the new one came down.

Substances in all cases are not revealed as part of keeping player personal medical records private.

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