Neil Young says his US citizenship is delayed over cannabis use

Neil Young says his attempt to gain US citizenship to vote in next year's presidential election has been delayed (Gary Miller/Getty Images)
Neil Young says his attempt to gain US citizenship to vote in next year's presidential election has been delayed (Gary Miller/Getty Images)

Neil Young’s American citizenship has been delayed due to his "use of marijuana", the 73-year-old has said.

The Canadian-born singer revealed that while he passed the citizenship test, he has been called to take another as he attempts to gain a US citizenship to vote in next year's presidential election.

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He said in a post to his website: "I have been told that I must do another test, due to my use of marijuana and how some people who smoke it have exhibited a problem."

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Young, who has resided predominantly in the US since the 60s, said the immigration policy proposed by former attorney general Jeff Sessions and implemented this year was proving to be the obstacle.

Neil Young with his wife, actress Daryl Hannah (Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for SXSW)
Neil Young with his wife, actress Daryl Hannah (Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for SXSW)

The policy states: "An applicant who is involved in certain marijuana-related activities may lack GMC (Good Moral Character) if found to have violated federal law, even if such activity is not unlawful under applicable state of foreign laws.”

Young went on: “I sincerely hope I have exhibited good moral character and will be able to vote my conscience on Donald J Trump and his fellow American candidates (as yet un-named),

"I will keep you posted, but I don't think I will be able to remain parked here during the proceedings."

Neil Young and Promise of the Real perform in Hyde Park, London, in 2019 (KGC-138/STAR MAX/IPx)
Neil Young and Promise of the Real perform in Hyde Park, London, in 2019 (KGC-138/STAR MAX/IPx)

Young, who lost his Malibu home when it was destroyed in California wildfires last year, has previously expressed a desire to vote in the 2020 elections.

“I pay taxes down here; my beautiful family is all down here – they’re all Americans, so I want to register my opinion,” he told the Los Angeles Times.

“We’ve got a climate emergency, and governments are not acting.”

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