NBA player who was part of one of college basketball's biggest upsets had unique perspective on losing by 73

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NBA player who was part of one of college basketball's biggest upsets had unique perspective on losing by 73
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Ty Jerome dribbles the ball up the court.
Ty Jerome has been more embarrassed by a loss before.Michael Dwyer/AP Images
  • The Grizzlies beat the Thunder by 73 points, the largest defeat in NBA history.

  • Ty Jerome said it wasn't as embarrassing as his No. 1-ranked college team losing to a 16-seed.

  • Most Thunder players seemed to handle the loss well, despite the embarrassing nature of it.

The Memphis Grizzlies beat the Oklahoma City Thunder on Thursday as no NBA team has ever been beaten before.

The Grizzlies handed the Thunder a 152-79 loss. The 73-point margin is the largest in NBA history.

After the game, Thunder guard Ty Jerome was surprisingly even-keeled about the loss. Jerome played college basketball at Virginia and was on the top-seeded team upset by 16th-ranked UMBC in the 2018 NCAA Tournament.

"My sophomore year in college, we were the first (No. 1) seed to ever lose to a 16 seed," Jerome said after the game, according to Joe Mussatto of The Oklahoman. "Like, that's way more embarrassing than this NBA game.

"We can't overreact to this. Yeah, it's embarrassing. We were embarrassed out there for sure, but you don't just put your head down and start abandoning ship or pointing fingers. Coach said after the game, and he's right, a crucial part of us right now is we have to stick together."

Thunder coach Mark Daigneault walks off the court as two Thunder players walk behind him, one with his head down, another looking up.
It was a rough night for the Thunder.Justin Ford/USA TODAY Sports/Reuters

The Thunder were short-handed, missing leading scorer Shai Gilgeous-Alexander and versatile wing Josh Giddey. They had just 10 active players for the game.

Still, there were some incredible stats from the game:

  • The Grizzlies bench alone outscored the entire Thunder team, 93-79.

  • The Grizzlies outscored the Thunder in the paint, 82-79.

  • Grizzlies forward Santi Aldama led the team with a plus-minus of +52.

  • Thunder forward Jeremiah Earl-Robinson posted the worst plus-minus with a -56.

Across the board, members of the Thunder seemed to handle a loss where they at one point trailed by 78 pretty well.

"I think there was some slippage defensively and I think before you know it, teams are in a rhythm and the game is out of hand,'' Thunder forward Mike Muscala said. "We didn't fight, obviously. You'd rather go out fighting. You would rather go out putting your best foot forward and playing together.''

Thunder head coach Mark Daigneault said competition can come with extreme highs and lows.

"When you compete, you have exposure to the highs and lows of competition, and the competition comes with great joy, and it also comes with grief and frustration and anger," Daigneault said, adding: "That's why the joy feels so good, because when you get punched and you taste your own blood, it doesn't feel great."

Read the original article on Insider