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How much are Eric Heiden's skates from his record-setting Olympic performance worth? He wants to know, too.

Eric Heiden won five speedskating gold medals at the 1980 Winter Olympics, an achievement that has gone unmatched in the 45 years since.
Eric Heiden won five speedskating gold medals at the 1980 Winter Olympics, an achievement that has gone unmatched in the 45 years since.

Speedskater Eric Heiden, the Wisconsin native who captured Olympic history with five gold medals in the 1980 Winter Olympics, posted a picture of the skates he wore and posed an interesting question on Facebook.

"I've been asked to loan my skates from 1980 to a sports exhibition," Heiden wrote. "They asked me the value of the skates so they could insure them. I gave them an answer and they asked how this appraisal value was determined. Told them my dog and I sat down and discussed it. Needless to say they weren't impressed.

"So, what do my Facebook friends think is the value of an off the shelf pair of Viking skates?"

Plenty of responses chimed in with "priceless," including one from another Olympic speedskating legend, Apolo Anton Ohno, whose eight career medals make him the most decorated American Olympian in the winter games.

But nobody has topped what Heiden did in 1980, winning five gold medals in a single games.

"They did win 5 gold medals and I don't think there is another pair of skates that can make that claim…..yet(thinking Jordan Stolz)," Heiden wrote about the skates, referring to the 20-year-old Kewaskum phenom who's on a path to do something special in 2026.

More: Jordan Stolz wins World Allround speedskating title in record-setting fashion

Heiden was 21 years old when he wore those skates to unprecedented glory.

Heiden won the 500 meters; the 1,000; 1,500; and 5,000; then capped it off with the 10,000 win on Feb. 23, 1980. He famously slept through his alarm clock that morning, having been part of the "Miracle on Ice" celebration and attending the famous hockey game the night before, when the United States beat the Soviet Union.

Heiden's stance had always been that he wasn't interested in prolonged fame and would walk away from competitive skating thereafter, and that's what he did.

Though he also began a career in competitive cycling (even competing in the 1986 Tour de France), he started college at the University of Wisconsin in his native Madison, then transferred to Stanford and ultimately became an orthopedic surgeon; he's been based in in Park City, Utah, since 2006, and many of his patients are injured athletes.

This article originally appeared on Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Wisconsinite Eric Heiden wonders about worth of record-setting skates