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Moises Caicedo ‘really worried’ about his family’s safety in strife-torn Ecuador

Moises Caicedo - Moises Caicedo ‘really worried’ about his family’s safety in strife-torn Ecuador

Mauricio Pochettino has revealed that Chelsea’s record signing Moises Caicedo has been “really worried” about the safety of his family in Ecuador.

Telegraph Sport last week reported that Chelsea have offered support, which is believed to include paying for round-the-clock security, to the family of Caicedo and wonderkid Kendry Paez and his family, who live in Ecuador.

Ecuador is going through a period of unrest that has included a wave of attacks by criminal organisations. Paez still plays and lives in his home country because he cannot move to Chelsea until his 18th birthday next year, while Caicedo’s family are there.

The father of Liverpool’s Colombian forward, Luis Díaz, was kidnapped and held hostage for 12 days, which has understandably prompted fears among Ecuador’s most notable footballers.

Chelsea did not comment on the nature of their ongoing support, but it is believed to include paying for security, and Pochettino confirmed he has discussed the issue with Caicedo, who he insists is OK to play in the second leg of the Carabao Cup semi-final against Middlesbrough on Tuesday night.

“It is true that a few weeks ago he was really worried and now it is more relaxed,” said Chelsea head coach Pochettino. “When all these things happened we were talking to the player and, of course, we gave all the elements to try to help him.

“The family is good and is safe, and every day we are talking about how the situation is in Ecuador. At the moment it is good news in his case, with him, with his family.

“The situation is not easy. In South America, it is not only Ecuador. Normally, the club cares for not just him but for everyone. If you have problems the club is there to try to help us in different ways. It is a good thing from the club to help the player because we need him in his best condition to compete.

“You know very well that this could affect the performance of the player. If something is going wrong with the family. He is OK now, he is better now, he feels better. He says the situation there is not normal, but it is improving.”

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