Joe Wieland

#67SP,
Height: 6' 2"
Weight: 205
Bat: R
Throw: R
Born:
College: None
Birth Place: Reno, Nevada
Draft: 2008 4th round by the
  • Why Jim Callis thinks Luis Robert is going to have a gigantic impact on White Sox
    CSN Chicago

    Why Jim Callis thinks Luis Robert is going to have a gigantic impact on White Sox

    Jim Callis thinks the Luis Robert signing is going to have a gigantic impact on the organization well beyond adding another elite talent. When Robert officially joins the White Sox sometime next week, Callis projects the Cuban outfielder will initially be ranked the No. 27 prospect in baseball on MLBPipeline.com. That ranking is one spot ahead of Atlanta Braves shortstop Kevin Maitan, who previously was the No. 1 prospect in the 2016-17 international class. But Callis likes the deal — reportedly worth between $25-30 million — because of what it could mean for the White Sox under the rules of the new Collective Bargaining Agreement where the playing field is leveled. Whereas teams could spend

  • Giants lineup: Nunez returns, Panik gets night off vs Braves
    NBCS Bay Area

    Giants lineup: Nunez returns, Panik gets night off vs Braves

    SAN FRANCISCO -- After Wednesday's game in Chicago, Bruce Bochy talked of the bullpen and said "we've got to get our lefties going." One of them is no longer in the big leagues. The Giants optioned Steven Okert back to Triple-A Sacramento before Friday's game to clear a roster spot for Aaron Hill. Hill hasn't played since April 22. He was batting .120 in 12 games before feeling discomfort in his throwing arm, and the recovery was slower than the Giants first expected. Okert took on a big role in the bullpen upon being recalled, and he had a couple of huge multi-inning outings in wins. But the ERA is up to 6.23 and Bochy felt Okert had lost some confidence on the mound. The Giants are again back

  • Stadium deaths: Are Major League Baseball facilities safe enough?
    USA Today

    Stadium deaths: Are Major League Baseball facilities safe enough?

    At about 10:57 p.m. on May 16, a 42-year-old man named Rick Garrity was exiting Wrigley Field in Chicago when he apparently tried to climb a 36-inch rail on a ramp leading from the upper deck, according to Chicago Cubs and police officials. “That is a very tragic event that sadly has been seen far too often over the last several years,” said Bob Gorman, co-author of the book Death at the Ballpark. It’s still quite rare: Out of hundreds of millions of fans in Major League Baseball parks since 1969, there have been 25 deaths from falling in stadiums, including some involving inebriated victims and suicide, Gorman said. In this case, the Cubs asserted the rail and its height did not contribute to the man’s death at Wrigley.