MLB Hall of Famer Tom Seaver diagnosed with dementia, will retire from public life

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FILE - In this July 26, 2015, file photo, National Baseball Hall of Famer Tom Seaver arrives for an induction ceremony at the Clark Sports Center in Cooperstown, N.Y. Seaver has been diagnosed with dementia and has retired from public life. The family of the 74-year-old made the announcement Thursday, March 7, 2019, through the Hall and said Seaver will continue to work in the vineyard at his home in California. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)
Baseball Hall of Famer Tom Seaver has been diagnosed with dementia and has retired from public life. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)

Major League Baseball Hall of Famer Tom Seaver was recently diagnosed with dementia, his family announced in a statement released by the National Baseball Hall of Fame on Thursday.

As a result, Seaver “has chosen to completely retire from public life.”

“Tom will continue to work in his beloved vineyard at his California home, but has chosen to completely retire from public life,” the statement said. “The family is deeply appreciative of those who have supported Tom throughout his career, on and off the field, and who do so now by honoring his request for privacy. We join Tom in sending warmest regards to everyone.”

Seaver, 74, pitched in the majors from 1967-86, predominantly with the New York Mets, accumulating 311 wins in the process.

Along the way, Seaver, a 6-foot-1 righty, was a 12-time All-Star, won three Cy Young Awards and helped the Mets win their first World Series in 1969. As the ace for the ‘69 “Miracle” Mets, Seaver won 25 games and had a 2.21 earned-run average in 35 starts.

In addition to his time in New York, Seaver also pitched for the Cincinnati Reds, Chicago White Sox and Boston Red Sox. Seaver threw a no-hitter as a member of the Reds on June 16, 1978.

Seaver was a first ballot Hall of Famer when he received 425 of 430 votes in 1992. That percentage of votes — 98.84 percent — was a record until Ken Griffey Jr. received 99.32 percent of the votes (437/440) in 2016. In January, New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera passed both by being unanimously elected to the Hall of Fame, appearing on all 425 ballots.

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