MLB changing its harassment, discrimination policies after ex-Mets GM Jared Porter and Mickey Callaway allegations

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Scott Thompson
·2 min read
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MLB is updating its workplace code of conduct regarding sexual harassment and discrimination, according to The Athletic's Lindsey Adler, following harassment allegations that led to the termination of Mets GM Jared Porter and the suspension of Angels pitching coach and former Mets manager Mickey Callaway.

Michele Meyer-Shipp, MLB's chief people and culture officer, led the way with this initiative, the report said, which developed after Porter was booted in January. A third-party anonymous hotline will be implemented to report incidents of harassment, as well as all team executives being required to go through "anti-harassment and discrimination training" at spring training.

"Major League Baseball is committed to ensuring that all individuals who work in and around the game are welcomed and treated equally, with dignity, respect and professionalism," MLB said in a statement to The Athletic. "To accomplish this goal, MLB and its Clubs will continue to strive to create environments in which people feel safe and accepted — and when they do not, they feel comfortable speaking up without fear of recrimination, retaliation, or exclusion.”

A flier with bold red letters reading, "Speak Up," will also be posted in all clubhouses. It breaks down what an individual should do if he or she ssees any wrongdoing.

"We wanted to make it clear for people that there were several ways you could speak up," Meyer-Shipp said.

A Zoom meeting between the Baseball Writers Association of America and MLB -- led by chief communications officer Pat Courtney -- was also held, to which Meyers-Shipp said, "We were all on the same page."

Mets owner Steve Cohen released a tweet on the morning of Jan. 19 to say Porter had been terminated following an ESPN report that detailed explicit text messages and pictures sent to a female reporter in 2016 while he was with the Chicago Cubs.

"There should be zero tolerance for this type of behavior," Cohen said.

And last week, the Angels suspended Callaway after five women came forward detailing aggressive pursuits by the former Mets skipper, both in person and over text/email, in a piece by The Athletic.

"I was appalled by the actions reported today of former manager Mickey Callaway," team president Sandy Alderson said. "I was unaware of the conduct described in the story at the time of Mickey’s hire or at any time during my tenure as General Manager. We have already begun a review of our hiring processes to ensure our vetting of new employees is more thorough and comprehensive.”