Mike Piazza bullish on Jacob deGrom's Hall of Fame chances: 'I think you have to take him seriously right now'

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Danny Abriano
·3 min read
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Jacob deGrom releases a pitch eyes visible, baseball visible facing forward in road gray uniform
Jacob deGrom releases a pitch eyes visible, baseball visible facing forward in road gray uniform

As Jacob deGrom has become the best pitcher in baseball over the last three seasons and won back-to-back National League Cy Young awards, talk about his Hall of Fame credentials has perked up.

If you look at where deGrom stands when it comes to an archaic counting stat like wins and losses for a pitcher -- a stat that is not really relevant in the current era -- his candidacy could be lacking.

But if you simply look at the dominance deGrom has displayed since entering the league in 2014, he looks like a pitcher who can ride a shorter career (deGrom didn't debut until his age-26 season) to a spot in Cooperstown.

Mike Piazza, the only Mets player aside from Tom Seaver who is in the Hall of Fame with a Mets cap on his plaque, touched on the deGrom Hall of Fame question on Monday.

"I think you have to take him seriously right now," Piazza told reporters via Zoom "I've never been a huge minutiae numbers guy and getting into the arguments because I think ultimately that's for (the voters) and guys that really study the game and put perspectives in history.

"I always kind of go with sort of the character or at least the perception of dominance. I don't know how you could not take him seriously in that regard, because he's doing some incredible things. ... and it just doesn't seem like he's slowing down. Knock on wood. He's been healthy. But again, I think when the dust settles on his career and you're able to put it in a historical perspective, that's kind of when it will be the real sort of test."

DeGrom, who is entering his age-32 season, has a 2.61 ERA and 1.04 WHIP with 1,359 strikeouts (10.5 per 9) in his first seven seasons in the majors.

He has a Rookie of the Year award (2014) to go along with his two Cy Young awards, and also has some indelible postseason moments on his ledger from the Mets' 2015 run to the World Series.

If you compare deGrom's current run of dominance to someone like Sandy Koufax, who won three Cy Young awards in a four-year span before retiring after the 1966 season at the age of 30, deGrom holds up well.

And if deGrom keeps pitching like he has over the last three seasons, he will likely have an incredibly strong Hall of Fame case.

"I'm partial because I like him and I think he's a great guy," Piazza said. "He's a super personality and just goes about his business in such a great way that you do have to kind of take that into account, for me. He just has to keep doing what he's doing.

"I (told him) 'don't change anything.' If it's not broken, don't fix it. Don't go out there and feel like you have to do so much more every single year to re-prove (yourself). I think he's able to really keep it in perspective and knows what he can do and can't do, and knows that to (keep) himself healthy over the course of a season, he has to do certain things."

With a smirk at the end about how his own Hall of Fame voting process went, Piazza concluded about deGrom:

"I think, hopefully, when the dust does settle, he could be there. Never give 100 percent, though."