Michael Kopech hasn't had a good June, but that hasn't changed White Sox optimism regarding top pitching prospect

Vinnie Duber
NBC Sports Chicago
<p>It's been a rough June for Michael Kopech, but the results out of Charlotte haven't changed the optimism the White Sox have in regards to their top-ranked pitching prospect.</p>

Michael Kopech hasn't had a good June, but that hasn't changed White Sox optimism regarding top pitching prospect

It's been a rough June for Michael Kopech, but the results out of Charlotte haven't changed the optimism the White Sox have in regards to their top-ranked pitching prospect.

It wasn't long ago that the question was: "Why isn't Michael Kopech pitching in the major leagues?"

The question is now firmly: "What's wrong with Michael Kopech?"

The new script is of course a reflection of how quickly opinions change during a baseball season, when "what have you done for me lately?" tends to drive the conversation more than looking at the entire body of work.

But the body of work doesn't look too awesome for the White Sox top-ranked pitching prospect these days. He carries a 5.08 ERA through 14 starts with Triple-A Charlotte. But it's the recent struggles that have folks second guessing whether he's ready for the big leagues.

The month of June hasn't gone well for Kopech, who has a 9.00 ERA in four starts this month. That features two especially ugly outings, when he allowed seven runs in two innings and five runs in three outings. But for a guy who's got blow-em-away stuff, it's the walks that are of the utmost concern to box-score readers: He's got 21 of them in 16 innings over his last four starts. That's compared to 20 strikeouts.

More walks than strikeouts is never a good thing, and it's been a glaring bugaboo for White Sox pitchers at the major league level all season. Kopech wasn't having that problem when this season started out. He struck out 68 batters and walked only 25 over his first 10 starts. But things have changed.

With director of player development Chris Getz on the horn Thursday to talk about all of the promotions throughout the minor league system, he was asked about Kopech and pointed to Wednesday's outing, which lasted only five innings and featured four more walks. But Kopech only allowed two earned runs, and Getz called it a good outing.

"Last night I was really happy with what he was able to do, and that's really in comparison looking at his last probably four outings or so," Getz said. "He did have a little bit of a hiccup, getting a little erratic. He was getting a little quick in his delivery, his lower half wasn't picking up with his upper half. The command of his pitches was not there.

"But last night, although the line is not the best line that we've seen of Michael this year, it was still a very good outing. He was in the zone, commanding the fastball. His body was under control. He threw some good breaking pitches, a couple of good changeups. He was back to being the competitor we are accustomed to. We are hoping to build off of this outing. I know he's feeling good about where he's at from last night and we'll just kind of go from there."

It's important to note, of course, that the White Sox are often looking for things that can't be read in a box score. So when we see a lot of walks or a lot of hits or a small amount of strikeouts, that doesn't tell the whole story nor does it count as everything the decision makers in the organization are looking at.

Still, this is development and growth in action - and perhaps a sign that the White Sox have been right in not yet deeming Kopech ready for the majors. Kopech perhaps needs the time at Triple-A to work through these issues rather than be thrown into a big league fire.

As for how these struggles will affect his timeline, that remains to be seen. The White Sox aren't ruling anything out, not promising that he'll be on the South Side before the end of this season but certainly not ruling it out either.

"If he builds off of what he did last night, commanding his fastball, his breaking pitches continue to kind of define themselves, I think we've got a chance to see him," Getz said. "He's going to find his way to the big leagues. He's going to be an impact frontline type starter. I'm very confident in that.

"Now just like a lot of great players, sometimes it's a meandering path. And to say that he's gone off track is not fair because it's only been a couple of outings. I think he's in a really good spot. If he builds off of this, I don't think it's unfair to think he'll be up here at some point."

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