Michael Conforto keeps focus on improvement amid lack of Mets extension talks

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Garrett Stepien
·3 min read
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Michael Conforto spring training
Michael Conforto spring training

Where the Mets and RF Michael Conforto stand on a potential contract extension has been addressed by both sides since spring training opened last week in Port St. Lucie, Fla.

Conforto, who turns 28 next Monday, was honest Tuesday when asked about his situation -- while a conversation had not started, he is thinking of what will happen.

Wednesday on Mets Hot Stove, Conforto delved deeper into his mindset during an interview with SNY's Steve Gelbs.


"I'm not going to lie -- it's something that I think about," Conforto said. "Like you said, the conversation hasn't started yet. So there's nothing really to to talk about, at this point.

"But I have found that, when I'm out there on the field, it's super easy to to just forget about all that stuff. That's what's great about right now is that I'm able to go to my sanctuary and just work on baseball, just play the game that I love with with some great people. So it's really easy for me to just let all that stuff go when I'm out there playing baseball.

"And we'll see what happens. I don't know when the conversation will start, but we'll just see what happens. We're going to take it one day at a time."

In 632 regular-season games from 2015-20, Conforto has slashed .259/.358/.484 with 118 home runs and 341 RBI.

As a sixth-year pro during the shortened 2020 season, Conforto slashed .322/.412/.515 with nine home runs and 31 RBI in 54 games.

While he is not naïve to the possibility of an extension entering his contract year, Conforto remains locked in on all-around improvement.

"I think the things that I did were I stayed a little bit more level with my swing -- wasn't so worried about hitting home runs the pull side," Conforto said. "I put myself in a better position, in a more balanced position, in a ready position -- when the pitch comes out of the hand so I'm able to to recognize and just let my natural swing flow. Took what the pitcher gave me -- if there was nobody on the left side and they leave a pitch out over the plate, shoot the ball the other way and take your double or your single or whatever it is.

"I think those are all things that I've always expected myself to do. But when you get wrapped up in trying to hit home runs and trying to be the hero, I think it can take you away from what's most natural to you. And I think the name of the game is you get your your pitch, you do damage. But if you don't, you hand the bat to the next guy and you trust that the next guy is going to get the job done. You get yourself on base however you can and then you you let the next guy be the hero."