Mets' rotation off to best start of any team in last 109 years

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Chris Bassitt about to deliver pitch at Citi Field day game April 2022
Chris Bassitt about to deliver pitch at Citi Field day game April 2022

Filling in for the injured Taijuan Walker on Sunday, David Peterson tossed 4.1 scoreless innings against the Arizona Diamondbacks while continuing the early-season starting rotation dominance that has helped lift the Mets to a 7-3 record.

The Mets' 1.07 rotation ERA through their first 10 games is not only the lowest mark in franchise history, but the lowest mark by any starting rotation through 10 games since the earned run became an officially tracked stat in 1913 (per Sports Radar).

That the Mets' rotation -- even without Jacob deGrom for now -- has been incredibly good should not be a surprise. But the extent to which New York's starters have dominated has been wild, especially when you consider that four of the six runs the rotation has given up have been charged to Max Scherzer.

A breakdown of the numbers:

50.1 innings pitched
Six runs (all earned)
1.07 ERA
0.75 WHIP
11 walks
59 strikeouts

It is here where we'll put another reminder that the Mets' rotation is dominating without deGrom, who did this over his first 10 starts last season:

64.0 innings pitched
Seven runs (four earned)
0.56 ERA
Eight walks
103 strikeouts

I've written a few times before today something that is quite obvious -- what the Mets' rotation is doing is not sustainable. Things will regress toward the mean a bit. Tylor Megill will eventually allow a run. Someone will have a bad start at some point.

Apr 7, 2022; Washington, District of Columbia, USA; New York Mets starting pitcher Tylor Megill (38) throws a pitch against the Washington Nationals during the first inning at Nationals Park.
Apr 7, 2022; Washington, District of Columbia, USA; New York Mets starting pitcher Tylor Megill (38) throws a pitch against the Washington Nationals during the first inning at Nationals Park.

But while noting the above, it's also fair to believe that what the Mets' rotation has done so far is not a fluke. It has not been luck. And you can't say it's because of weak offensive opponents -- not when the rotation was lights out against the Phillies in Philadelphia.

Megill, featuring a fastball that now tops out at 99 mph, has looked like a different pitcher. Chris Bassitt has been as advertised. Carlos Carrasco looks healthy for the first time as a Met. And the aforementioned Scherzer has been very good despite dealing with a hamstring issue in his first start and not really looking like himself yet.

Anything can happen over the course of 162 games, but if the Mets' rotation is humming when deGrom returns, watch out.

It was one thing to picture a Mets rotation with deGrom, Scherzer, and Bassitt at the top. But that rotation will take on an even more menacing look if Megill is closer to the pitcher we've seen this season than the one he was during his rookie campaign in 2021 and/or if Carrasco is back to being the pitcher he was in Cleveland.

Then there's Walker, who looked like the first half version of himself who made the All-Star team last season in his brief outing against the Phillies last week. The expectation is that Walker (who is on the IL with shoulder bursitis) will make two rehab starts before returning to the rotation, with the first expected to come this week.

As far as deGrom, he is scheduled to have a follow-up MRI a week from today. And if the doctors like what they see, he could soon be cleared to throw.

For now, though, the Mets' rotation is in good hands.