Mets' Pete Alonso on pitchers using pine tar: 'I'd rather have guys have as much stick as possible'

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·2 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Pete Alonso swinging at the plate vs. Diamondbacks
Pete Alonso swinging at the plate vs. Diamondbacks

With MLB starting to crack down on "sticky stuff" on the mound, one of the game's superstars, and the manager of the first place Mets are of course going to asked about it.

They were before their Wednesday's matchup against the Baltimore Orioles.

For the slugging first baseman - give the pitchers as much sticky stuff as they want.

"Absolutely not. I don't think so," Pete Alonso said when asked if MLB is doing the right thing for trying to stop the situation. "...I go in the box every single day, and I see guys throw harder and harder every day. I don't want 99 slipping out of someone's hand because they didn't have enough feel for it...

"Let's say they lose a fastball arm-side, we all saw what happened the Kevin Pillar, and that's scary. We're lucky that he only had a broken nose. It could be a lot worse depending on where it hits the guy. One-hundred-mile-an-hour fastball, even though you're wearing a helmet, that's scary. I'd rather have guys have as much stick as possible and focus on throwing the ball in the box as opposed to taking it away from them."

Manager Luis Rojas said he is waiting for MLB to send out its memo regarding foreign substances to speak to his pitchers. He also said he is "unaware" of his pitchers using anything illegal, and is opposed to it.

"I read the rule book every year once or twice, and it is in the rule book not to use any substance on the ball," he said.

Rojas said he has used pine tar when tossing BP in the cold to get a better grip.

"I just don't have any knowledge of improving your repertoire. But I do know about command, where you have something in your hand, you use the rosin, you use something that's gonna make you have better command, better feel for the ball that's just gonna have better feel where you're gonna throw it," he added.

Alonso said if he has every advantage to improve his grip on his bat - he mentioned pine tar, batting gloves, lizard skin, and special spray - so should the pitchers.

"You name it, we have it [in the on-deck circle]. I wouldn't care if they had that behind the mound to help hold onto the ball," Alonso said.