Mets manager Buck Showalter ready to let his embrace of analytics do the talking: 'We'll show you'

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Buck Showalter jersey swap Mets jacket and hat fully visible in dugout
Buck Showalter jersey swap Mets jacket and hat fully visible in dugout

After being officially introduced on Tuesday by Sandy Alderson and Billy Eppler as the next manager of the Mets, Buck Showalter spent roughly an hour answering questions from reporters about exactly how he'll manage this time around.

Specifically, Showalter -- whose last managerial stint was with the Baltimore Orioles from 2010 to 2018 -- will be working with a fully-formed and modern analytics department for the first time.

And while it was clear even before the Mets hired him that Showalter was not anti-analytics (quite the opposite, actually), he spent a lot of his introductory news conference talking about how he'll blend the use of analytics and the human element.

"The adaption of different methodology, you look at certain guys without mentioning names and their ability to do that. It's how they have continued to have success," Showalter said. "All the information out there, I'll just say this: If somebody thinks that I'm gonna go back to the hotel or the house and think that maybe we got beat because someone else had better (information) or used information better than we did, or analytics -- whatever you want to call it -- you don't know me very well.

"I've always been very spongeful with information to a fault. And just like everybody else, I don't have a corner on it. There's a lot of smart people in this game. But if you think that I'm gonna let somebody beat us by having better analytical information or because someone on the staff doesn't understand it, then I'm not gonna talk about it. We'll show you."

In addition to having an analytics team at his disposal, Showalter -- as is the case with every manager -- will be expected to collaborate with the front office, which is something he is not shying away from.

"One thing the manager has to do is create avenues where every department feels comfortable and everybody can bring what they bring," Showalter said.

"The great organizations, almost in any sport, have a real connectivity between the general manager, the field staff, and ownership. It's something I know is not gonna be a challenge here."

Mets manager Buck Showalter holds up his No. 11 jersey during his introductory news conference.
Mets manager Buck Showalter holds up his No. 11 jersey during his introductory news conference.

Added Showalter on collaboration between departments:

"I think that whole relationship -- pretty much everywhere that I've been -- that relationship with the general manager and front office has been fun, for one thing. ... You've got that feeling that everyone is pulling in the same direction, and you have your times when you're bouncing things off each other.

"You have a certain vulnerability that you should have and let people see. You have an opinion, but at the same time you have a respect for other people's opinion. There's a lot of very smart people in this game. If anything, I'll be accused of asking too many opinions. That's how you find out."

As far as whether he'll have to change his style to adapt, Showalter said he had spoken to current veteran managers Tony La Russa, Dusty Baker, and Joe Maddon to "pick their brain" on what he can expect and what might be different.

And regarding how he'll manager the modern player, Showalter explained that it boiled down do what the players need from him.

"It's trying to bring what a player needs and trying to evaluate what they need," Showalter said. "Your ego's not as such -- you have that vulnerability to deliver it. That's the end game.

"The game is about the players. It's about creating an environment that makes their skills come to the top. And being proactive with things before you have to be reactive to them. To have your finger on the pulse of things in there."