Mets' Francisco Lindor on recent hitting struggles: 'I don't feel like I'm in a slump'

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Scott Thompson
·2 min read
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Francisco Lindor Mets making contact April 2021 at Citi Field
Francisco Lindor Mets making contact April 2021 at Citi Field

Despite what the numbers might say, Mets star shortstop Francisco Lindor doesn’t believe he’s in a slump whatsoever.

“I feel like I’ve had quality at-bats," Lindor said on Wednesday. "Feel like I haven’t put the best swing on the baseballs these past couple of games, but I don’t feel like I’m in a slump. A slump for me is when I’m 0-for-35, 0-for-30. That for me is a slump."

“Maybe for people here in New York or the media and for other teams, they might think I’m in a slump. But I don’t feel like I’m in a slump."

He’s got a point. While Lindor hasn’t had the production the Mets, or anyone for that matter, expected, he’s not totally on a downward trend. He’s slashing .212/.321/.273 with just one homer and three RBI over his first 18 games. Lindor also has a four-game hit streak, collecting four hits over his last 17 at-bats.

But he does know the source of his struggles at least, and he’s working to correct them as soon as possible.

“I know exactly what I’m doing, that’s why I’m not frustrated in the sense where I’m going home, or after every at-bat, I’m consistently thinking and thinking and thinking because I know what’s happening,” he explained.

“I’m not getting the barrel to the baseball. As I’m getting to the baseball, I drop the barrel. Or as I’m getting to the baseball, I get around it. That’s pretty much it. I haven’t consistently this year got the barrel to the baseball.”

You may hear hitters say, “Go to the ball,” or, “Throw your hands at the ball.” It basically means getting the barrel quickly through the zone and to the ball as quickly and efficiently as possible. You may have also seen Lindor swinging under some fastballs, or not quite connecting on other pitches that look to catch a bunch of the plate.

For hitters as good as Lindor, those type of struggles can still occur. Now, New York fans booing him on Tuesday night at Citi Field didn’t help matters, but Lindor doesn’t take it to heart.

“They expect results. I expect results. And I get it,” he said, saying it’s the first time in his career that he’s heard boos because of his performance.

At the end of the day, it’s only 18 games, so there’s certainly time for Lindor to work through it. That’s all he can do. And he knows it.