First look: Major review of FTSE 100 companies' diversity numbers and other

Lianna Brinded
·Head of Yahoo Finance UK
·3 min read

Watch: The McKenzie Delis Packer Review

The organisations behind The McKenzie-Delis Packer Review has released a number of highlights from the report, which will be launched on 20 November, which provide insight in how Britain’s biggest companies approach diversity and inclusion.

In a launch event, supported by the parent company of Yahoo Finance, Verizon Media, diversity and inclusion membership organisation DIAL Global and respected pollsters, Ipsos Mori unveiled a number of key stats from the survey of 44 companies who took part revealed how firms are tackling greater equity for those from marginalised communities.

“The diversity and inclusion agenda of this country belongs to all of us. It’s a collective responsibility that we all share to drive equality and shine a light on ours and others’ individuality,’’ said Leila McKenzie-Delis, founder of DIAL Global and the McKenzie-Delis Packer Review.

“Individuals are much more likely to speak up when they believe that their position is supported by others, and remain silent when they believe that it is not.”

Responses include:

  • “Do you publish your ethnicity pay gap?” — 76% said no, 22% said yes, and 3% of respondents said they “don’t know.”

  • The workforce feel that their career could stall if they have children while they work there” — 43% disagree, 25% neither agree or disagree, 17% agree, 15% don’t know.

  • “Leaders within the organisation speak openly about their lived experience of mental health conditions” — 63% agree, 15% neither agree nor disagree, 18% disagree, 4% don’t know.

“It is truly required as a tool to recognise respect and protect individual diversities and better understand how it can be translated into both business and leadership practices for all,” said DIAL Global.

The full report, which will be launched on 20 November, looks at 10 distinct aspects of diversity and inclusion — ethnicity, gender, age, nationality, mental health, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, disability, religion, and parenthood. These ten facets are considered by the network to be key areas of attention for organisations dedicated to improving workplace diversity and inclusion.

The data for the review was collected from 79 UK employers including FTSE and private companies and public sector organisations. The interviews were conducted online by benchmark pollster Ipsos MORI between July and September this year.

Research partners include — The Parker Review, Stonewall, Hampton Alexander Review, upReach, Centre for Ageing Better, Business Disability Forum, Equality and Human Rights Commission, Minds at Work, and Power of the Parent.

READ MORE: UK's gender pay gap among all employees at 15.5% in 2020

The report points out that results from the survey are “presented unweighted and should be treated as indicative and not statistically robust.”

“For example, the 44 FTSE 500 companies who took part, if examined alone will have a margin of error of as much as c+/-11-20% depending on the percentage result being considered,” the report added.

“The sample by definition is skewed towards larger employers and the NHS, and therefore is not representative of UK employers as a whole. The overall profile of responses on different dimensions of diversity is however worthy of reflection, with these provisos.”

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