Malcolm Brogdon says Milwaukee is 'very behind in terms of being progressive'

Yahoo Sports
<a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="/nba/teams/milwaukee/" data-ylk="slk:Milwaukee Bucks">Milwaukee Bucks</a> guard <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="/nba/players/5667/" data-ylk="slk:Malcolm Brogdon">Malcolm Brogdon</a> spoke to The Guardian about his political voice and the perception of Milwaukee as a "segregated" city. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)
Milwaukee Bucks guard Malcolm Brogdon spoke to The Guardian about his political voice and the perception of Milwaukee as a "segregated" city. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash)

Milwaukee Bucks guard Malcolm Brogdon is more than just one of the top contributors on the team with the best record in the NBA.

He also has a political voice, as he divulged in an interview with The Guardian published earlier this week, talking at length about his background growing up in Atlanta, the current political climate in America and the perception of Milwaukee as a “segregated” city.

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In the story, Brogdon responded to controversial comments made in 2016 by Bucks president Peter Feigin, when he called Milwaukee “the most segregated, racist place I've ever experienced in my life.”

Brogdon told The Guardian that he was not surprised:

“Before I came to Milwaukee I’d heard the city was the most segregated in the country. I’d heard it was racist. When I got here it was extremely segregated. I’ve never lived in a city this segregated. Milwaukee’s very behind in terms of being progressive. There are things that need to change rapidly.”

Brogdon, who was named after Malcolm X and has the nickname “The President,” was drafted by the Bucks in 2016. In the interview with The Guardian, he noted that change begins with ownership taking a more progressive stance. He also suggested that the team’s success could potentially serve as a uniting factor for the city.

recent survey by the Brookings Institution found that Milwaukee had the highest black-white segregation in the country from 2013-2017. Last year, police used a stun gun on Bucks guard Sterling Brown after he was illegally parked outside a Walgreens despite video showing he was not confrontational while interacting with officers. After the video was released, the Bucks released a strong statement in support of Brown and NBA commissioner Adam Silver urged people to “not stick to sports.”

Brogdon said to The Guardian that the NBA is at the forefront of progressive sports leagues, comparing it to the NFL, where Colin Kaepernick still remains unemployed for kneeling during the national anthem.

“I’ve been a bit surprised, and encouraged, by the NBA’s support for athletes that speak out,” Brogdon told The Guardian. “Compared to the NFL it’s night and day.”

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