‘It makes everything a lot easier’ when Jayson Tatum, Jaylen Brown are in attack mode, says Boston coach Ime Udoka

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The Boston Celtics came out with an agenda on Wednesday night as they thrashed the Indiana Pacers 119 – 100 on their own home court with connected, energetic play by their two stars Jayson Tatum and Jaylen Brown with some serious additional punch being provided by veteran point guard Dennis Schroder filling in for Marcus Smart as a starter.

In one of the best counter-arguments to the tired narrative that Brown and Tatum struggle to play together making the rounds in recent days, the dup out up a combined 67 points, and a big game from Schoder helped put the Pacers away in the second half.

Asked about how he felt having not just the Jays but their German teammate clicking offensively in the win, head coach Ime Udoka was happy to note that “it makes everything a lot easier.”

“We’re looking for that to be a regular thing, obviously,” he added.

“You had Dennis (Schroder) in there with 23 (points), you’ve got three guys in attack mode, it’s hard to stop. But the thing I liked was the ball movement, the selflessness … Other than a little stretch in the second when (the Pacers) made a run, and when we went to some ISOs, we were really good moving the ball, playing out of the post, playing off splits, getting stops and getting out in transition so they score naturally.”

“They didn’t try and force much, and got everybody involved,” related the Celtics head coach.

In other words, exactly the opposite sort of play that has had the team struggling as a group of individuals each trying to win the game by themselves.

“Any time those two (Tatum and Brown) are rolling on the same page, you’re going to have a good offensive night,” affirmed Udoka.

And it certainly doesn’t hurt to play to their strengths, as the Celtics coach did.

“We’ve added to the package of using those two in similar actions,” he explained. “They may guard two or three guys one way, but when we put them into the action, it causes some hesitation and confusion at times.”

One thing is certain — when used in ways which play to their strengths, Boston’s star wings can indeed play together quite well; the key moving forward will be to make it replicable, and hopefully easily so.

This post originally appeared on Celtics Wire. Follow us on Facebook!

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