John Shipley: MLB's pace-of-play initiatives aren't working

Twin Cities
John Shipley: MLB's pace-of-play initiatives aren't working
John Shipley: MLB's pace-of-play initiatives aren't working

It's a good line, and it came to mind Wednesday when, as soon as the last out was snatched from the air, official major league scorer Gregg Wong informed those in the Target Field press box that the Twins' 7-5 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals took 3 hours and 50 minutes. One gets lulled into the languid, deliberate pace of a baseball game when the sun is out and temperatures are high, as they were Wednesday, and there's something to be said for that. There's also something to be said for not spending half a game watching pitchers circle the mound and batters compulsively adjust the Velcro on their gloves. People have been complaining about the length of major league games for a long time now, mostly beat writers, who a) like to complain, b) have a platform from which to complain and c) for whom a baseball game really is what they call work.

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