Luis Rojas reacts to Steve Cohen's criticism of Mets' offense: 'We all have to be held accountable'

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Luis Rojas walking on field no mask close shot grey uniform
Luis Rojas walking on field no mask close shot grey uniform

Speaking before Wednesday's game after owner Steve Cohen's early morning tweet that took the Mets' struggling offense to task, manager Luis Rojas said that he understands where Cohen is coming from.

On Wednesday morning, Cohen tweeted:

"It’s hard to understand how professional hitters can be this unproductive. The best teams have a more disciplined approach. The slugging and OPS numbers don’t lie."

Rojas, who said he hadn't spoken to Cohen about the tweet, noted that a lot of the struggles boiled down to a blend of failing to get on base via the walk and hitting for power -- a philosophy he said is preached to Mets players as they rise through the minors.

And Rojas explained that Pete Alonso, Michael Conforto, Jeff McNeil, Dominic Smith, and Brandon Nimmo are among the players who "hit their way through the minors" using that approach.

"Those guys develop in the minor leagues with the approach that we're preaching to them today," Rojas said. "Our hitting coaches right now are a little bit more thorough with data than we were in the past. There's more information being exhausted to the guys. That would be the only difference. But as far as their approach and the identity that we have offensively, this has been preached to a lot of the guys coming up throughout our minor league system."

Added Rojas about the team's approach:

"We gotta chase less, we gotta stay in-zone, and we gotta take our 'A' swings so we can slug, we can crack the ball. That's what's gonna come in handy for us to get better production at the end of the day. If we try to do too much then we're gonna do even worse. We're gonna start chasing more, we're not gonna hit the ball hard. That's kind of like what happened already. That's what we're trying to get away from. Guys are working hard to make sure they can trim the zone and they can sharpen their approach."

Aug 4, 2021; Miami, Florida, USA; New York Mets right fielder Michael Conforto (30) celebrates with teammates after scoring a run against the Miami Marlins in the second inning at loanDepot Park.
Aug 4, 2021; Miami, Florida, USA; New York Mets right fielder Michael Conforto (30) celebrates with teammates after scoring a run against the Miami Marlins in the second inning at loanDepot Park.

Rojas cited the Mets' work ethic and need to keep things even keeled as a reason why he and the other coaches have continued to speak optimistically throughout the Mets' tailspin.

"There's no panic button here," Rojas said. "There's only work."

As far as whether he or any other members of the team felt "attacked" by Cohen's tweet, Rojas said no.

"We all gotta be held accountable for the team's performance," he said. "And I think the players are very vulnerable. They come here and say that they're frustrated. Some of them feel that they're underperforming and they're working really hard. We're all in this, so it doesn't single out one player, it doesn't single out one coach. At the end of the day, we gotta win games.

"Some areas right now are performing better than others, but we're all being held accountable for the team's performance at the end of the day. We don't feel like a single person is being attacked. We're all being accountable here. We just feel like we gotta work, be cross-functional, give ideas and think of different things so we can find the approach that we know that we can do and we've been working hard to get to."