LSU vs Kentucky: Quarterback tale of the tape

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After a demoralizing loss to Auburn on Saturday night in Death Valley, we’re onto Lexington with an SEC cross-divisional matchup with Kentucky. These teams haven’t played each other since the 2014 season. LSU 41-3 in Death Valley. In their last two matchups, the Tigers have won by a combined 76-10 margin. This marks the first LSU trip to Lexington since 2007, a loss to the Wildcats.

These are your typical LSU Tigers and definitely not your typical Kentucky Wildcats. Head coach Mark Stoops has his defense playing at a very high level. They look more like the LSU Tigers than the Tigers do. They run the football and play good defense. Kentucky could be in line for a letdown game after knocking off Florida in Lexington for the first time since 1986.

The two teams feature two quarterbacks who play a different style. Levis is more of a game manager, who throws if the situation calls upon it but they like to run the ball. Johnson is more of the gunslinger, who throws the ball for an average of 36.2 times a game. Levis has an average of 23.6 pass attempts per game.

Next, we compare the numbers

The Quarterback Tale of the Tape

Jordan Prather-USA TODAY Sports

A look at how Max Johnson compares to Will Levis of Kentucky. He became the quarterback of the Wildcats this season after transferring from Penn State. Here is how the gunslingers compare:

Max Johnson

vs

Will Levis

6-5

Ht

6-3

220

Wt

222

Sophomore

Class

RS Junior

113

Comp

73

181

Att

118

62.4

Comp%

61.9

1,468

Yards

989

8.1

YPA

8.4

16

TDs

8

4

INTs

6

The numbers are an advantage for Johnson in almost every category. The lefty has a slightly lower yard per attempt number and the completion percentages are almost even. Levis doesn’t have to throw it near as much as Johnson due to actually having a running game. In fact, they have the SEC’s No. 1 rusher in Chris Rodriguez Jr.

Both quarterbacks will give the defense an opportunity to take the ball away. Levis throws an interception every 19.7 pass attempts. Given he throws it 23.6 times a game on average, there will be an opportunity to take the ball away. Johnson throws an interception every 45.3 pass attempts.

Given everything we know about the two teams, the slight edge goes to Johnson. Mostly because he has to throw the ball to get the offense rolling. He is currently second in the SEC behind Bryce Young with 16 touchdown passes in five games.

List

LSU vs Kentucky: Grading the undefeated Wildcats