Longtime NFL quarterback, coach Wade Wilson dies at age 60

Yahoo Sports
Former <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="/nfl/teams/dallas/" data-ylk="slk:Dallas Cowboys">Dallas Cowboys</a> quarterbacks coach Wade Wilson, who also spent nearly 20 years as a quarterback in the NFL, died on Friday. (AP)
Former Dallas Cowboys quarterbacks coach Wade Wilson, who also spent nearly 20 years as a quarterback in the NFL, died on Friday. (AP)

Wade Wilson, who spent 18 years in the NFL as a quarterback and another 17 as quarterbacks coach, died on Friday.

It was the day of his 60th birthday.

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According to a release from the Dallas Cowboys, Wilson passed away at his home in Coppell, Texas.

An eighth-round draft pick of the Minnesota Vikings in 1981, Wilson spent a decade with the Vikings, appearing in 76 games with 48 starts. He was named to the Pro Bowl in 1988, when he had 10 starts (14 appearances) and led the NFL with a 61.4 completion percentage.

Wilson spent the 1992 season with the Atlanta Falcons, 1993-94 with the New Orleans Saints, 1995-97 with the Cowboys, and 1998-99 with the Oakland Raiders.

In 2000, Wilson began his new career as a quarterbacks coach. His first job was guiding his former teammate, Troy Aikman. Though he spent three seasons with the Bears (2004-06), Wilson returned to the Cowboys in 2007, coaching Tony Romo and then Dak Prescott.

Yahoo’s Charles Robinson wrote in 2016 that Wilson played a big role in Dallas ultimately drafting Prescott in the fourth round that year.

“He remained a big Kellen Moore backer behind Romo, but believed Prescott had the skills to develop down the line,” Robinson wrote.

Aikman tweeted, “Sad news today we lost a teammate far too soon. Wade Wilson was my backup from 1995-97 and my QB coach my last season in 2000. Prayers for his children and family.”

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