Listing pros and cons of the Philadelphia 76ers acquiring John Wall

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·4 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

The Philadelphia 76ers are still figuring out how they can improve their roster as they move forward with their title plans with Joel Embiid at the center of it all.

The Sixers thought Ben Simmons was the right cornerstone piece, but, after a miserable playoff run, Philadelphia has been looking to move on from the talented, yet maddening, All-Star guard. The Sixers are looking to add more of an aggressive scorer from the perimeter and a guy who can break down a defense in exchange for Simmons.

One name that popped up recently was Houston Rockets guard John Wall, who has been made available for trades as they move forward with their rebuild. ESPN’s Kendrick Perkins has been a big proponent of Wall being a great fit for the Sixers, but would he really?

We go over the pros and cons if the Sixers were to look into acquiring Wall from the Rockets:

Pro: his aggressiveness

Wall may not be the speed demon he once was during his prime, but he averaged 20.6 points, 6.9 assists and 3.2 rebounds in 40 games with Houston. He was quick getting to the basket. He pushed the pace, and he did not shy away from contact. He went to the foul line 5.3 times per game knocking down 74.9% of them. Wall's ability to get into the paint and attract the defense to be able to kick out to open teammates as well as looking to score for his own would be a huge help. There are too many times when the Sixers are dumping the ball down to Embiid hoping that he throws the team on his back. He needs some perimeter scoring help and Wall can do that.

Con: injury history

The 2020-21 season could be an exception. The Rockets held him out a bit toward the end of the season to give more time to their younger players, but he still played in only 40 games as injuries factored in. From 2017 through 2021, Wall has played a combined 113 games, and he missed the entire 2019-20 season with the Washington Wizards. It would be tough to really justify bringing in a guy like Wall and having to rely on him so much for a title run considering his past injury history. There is no guarantee he will be out there when it matters the most.

Pro: big playoff performances

Wall has proven in the past he can show up in the playoffs and make big things happen when his team needs it the most. The former All-Star averages 21.9 points, 9.8 assists, and 4.3 rebounds in his playoff career, and he has put on big performances on the bigger stages. Wall is not necessarily a great shooter -- a career 32.3% shooter from deep -- but at least he will take them. He averaged 3.1 3s per game in his career and he took 6.2 per game in the 2020-21 season. While the percentage isn't great, his willingness to take them is at least helpful.

Con: his contract

Shield your eyes! Wall is set to make roughly $44.3 million in the 2021-22 season and $47.3 million in the 2022-23 season. That is an exorbitant amount of money for a guy who has not played much over the previous four seasons. The Sixers would be taking a huge risk if they were to commit to Wall and bringing him in here considering his large deal and injury history.

Con: the deal itself

There are two ways the Sixers could make this deal work for Wall. One would be to trade Tobias Harris straight-up for him because the contracts match up precisely. In that case, Philadelphia could just move Simmons to the power forward once and for all, but the spacing would still be a bit of an issue. The other way would be to trade Simmons and some young players for Wall in order to make the salaries match. For example, Simmons along with Shake Milton and either Isaiah Joe or Paul Reed would make the deal work. This would be fine if it were a guy like Damian Lillard, but Wall is damaged goods at this point of his career.

1

1