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Letters to the Editor: L.A. shanks its shot at deterring city golf tee-time brokers

LOS ANGELES, CA-MARCH 19, 2020: Mario Kim plays a round at the Wilson & Harding Golf Course in Griffith Park on March 19, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. He wanted to play with his friend and said that the private course he belongs to is only allowing family members to help curb the spread of the coronavirus. (Photo By Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times)
A golfer hits a tee shot at Wilson Golf Course in Griffith Part in 2020. (Dania Maxwell / Los Angeles Times)

To the editor: I hope the solution being put in place to solve the problem of brokers taking tee times at city of Los Angeles golf courses and reselling them works, but I have my doubts.

Charging a nonrefundable deposit of $10 per person means that I must pay this amount before I even get to a golf course. Once there, I will have to collect money from each of the players in my foursome to recoup what I have advanced to the city.

And, with the additional no-show penalty, if someone in my group calls to say they are sick, I must also pay in addition to losing the deposit.

The real problem is a computerized reservation system that is gamed by the brokers. The fix isn't to penalize legitimate golfers.

As a 79-year-old retired teacher, I rely on golf for my physical well-being. Putting barriers up makes my golfing life more difficult.

Although many in the public assume that all golfers are fat cats playing a silly game, the reality is that you will find on our city courses retired police officers, firefighters, the elderly and younger working people who enjoy a chance to be outdoors with friends playing a challenging game.

Mike Cornner, Porter Ranch

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To the editor: Charging a nonrefundable deposit for golf reservations will not deter tee-time brokers, since they can just pass this cost increase to their customers. This new policy will hurt those golfers who may need to legitimately cancel a reservation.

There must be a better solution to stop the brokers from controlling reservations at our public courses.

Mitchell Blake, Culver City

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.