Let’s not take the $20 million Floyd Mayweather offer regarding Antonio Brown seriously, please

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·2 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

We ignored, unlike most other media outlets, the offer made recently by Floyd Mayweather to pay any NFL team that signs Antonio Brown $20 million if things don’t work out, or something. It was a publicity stunt, and they both got plenty of free publicity from it.

Unfortunately, they’re getting a little more now.

But it’s one thing to repeat Mayweather’s cartoonish ploy and to mention that it’s not realistic, or at a minimum to not comment on whether the offer was real and/or whether it would actually prompt a team to sign Brown when it otherwise had no inclination to do so. It’s quite another thing to push headlines that take the offer seriously, and that tee up the question of whether a given team should roll the dice on Brown, given the possibility of getting $20 million on the back end.

We won’t name names or run links or otherwise call out the person(s) who seem to think an NFL team would actually sign Brown because Floyd Mayweather promised them a huge payout if the move fails. For starters, it’s highly unlikely that the league would allow a team to take the money. Even then, the offer contains just enough wiggle room to let Mayweather try to find a way out of it.

Also, consider the exact language of the offer made by Mayweather. There’s a huge catch.

“They sign AB and AB go through the whole season, no problems at all, and then they gotta give us $20 million,” Mayweather said. “But if he mess up then we gotta give them $20 million.”

No one is making that bet. No one. In fact, the making of the offer — and Brown’s decision to push it on social media — could complicate his effort to get a roster spot, if there’s even a team currently thinking about doing it. The team that signs Brown would need his contract to spell out plainly and clearly that the $20 million gamble doesn’t apply, and they’d need Brown and Mayweather to declare it as loudly as the original offer was circulated.

The mere fact that these extra steps would be needed could be enough to keep a team on the “not worth it” side of the fence. Especially when Brown supposedly needs ankle surgery and has recently said he won’t get the procedure until he has a commitment from a team.

If that’s the standard, chances are that Brown won’t ever get that surgery.

Let’s not take the $20 million Floyd Mayweather offer regarding Antonio Brown seriously, please originally appeared on Pro Football Talk