Le'Ron McClain blames NFL for not helping him with mental health issues

Eric HeYahoo Sports Contributor
Former Alabama running back Le'Ron McClain said he was checking into a mental hospital on Saturday. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
Former Alabama running back Le'Ron McClain said he was checking into a mental hospital on Saturday. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

Former NFL running back Le’Ron McClain posted on Twitter on Saturday that he was checking himself into a mental health facility after posting a series of tweets criticizing the league for not helping him with his issues.

McClain has since deleted the tweets. A screenshot of a tweet posted at 4:58 a.m. on Saturday indicated McClain was planning to check into North Harbor Pavilion, a mental health facility in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

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He also criticized the NFL for not doing more to help.

One tweet that is still up appears to allege that the NFL Players Association denied McClain’s request for help.

“They really f------ denied me!!!!!! WTF!!! Man like damn. Man this is crazy,” McClain tweeted.

McClain claimed that he had a headache and had not slept for five nights. He asked for a doctor to “test my brain for CTE and all other things.”

McClain has been vocal on social media

This is not his first public comment on his mental health and accusations toward the league. In August, McClain tweeted about how he believed football had caused his head injuries, claiming his “brain is crazy.”

After attending Alabama, McClain spent seven years in the NFL with the Baltimore Ravens, Kansas City Chiefs and San Diego Chargers, making the Pro Bowl in both 2008 and 2009. He accrued 1,310 yards on the ground and 13 rushing touchdowns.

The 34-year-old last played for the Chargers in 2013. Though McClain had deleted his string of tweets by Saturday afternoon, he then posted a black heart emoji with no explanation:

Hopefully, McClain receives the help he needs — and that if his allegations against the league are true, that the NFL can live up to its own mental health initiatives.

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