Latest on Mets' search for pitching: Trevor Rosenthal signing with the Athletics

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Danny Abriano
·3 min read
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San Diego Padres relief pitcher Trevor Rosenthal reacts vs St. Louis Cardinals
San Diego Padres relief pitcher Trevor Rosenthal reacts vs St. Louis Cardinals

The Mets are looking for more starting pitching and bullpen help. Here's the latest...

Feb. 18, 11:02 a.m.

Hard throwing reliever Trevor Rosenthal, whom the Mets had interest in, is signing a one-year deal with the Oakland Athletics for $11 million, per multiple reports.

That amount of money for one year of Rosenthal, who didn't pitch in 2018 and was so bad in 2019 that he was sent to the minors, seems insane.

There's always a chance that what he did in 2020, when he had a 2.28 ERA and 0.84 WHIP while striking out 38 batters in 23.2 innings, is sustainable.

But $11 million for one year of someone as unreliable as Rosenthal is curious. And it's not surprising that the Mets didn't bid that high.

Feb. 13, 10:07 p.m.

Another potential starting pitching option for the Mets is off the market.

Left-hander James Paxton is heading back to Seattle, as first reported by Chad Dey of SportsNet 650 Vancouver. Paxton played his first six big-league seasons in Seattle before his two years with the Yankees.

According to multiple reports, Paxton's one-year deal is worth $8.5 million, with incentives that can raise it to $10 million.

With Paxton off the board, the Mets could potentially be looking at Jake Odorizzi or Taijuan Walker as a starting pitching option.

Jon Heyman said that the Mets tried for the lefty, but were outbid.

Feb. 12, 9:30 p.m.

On the same night it was reported that Jake Arrieta is heading back to the Chicago Cubs after three years in Philadelphia, it sounds like another starting pitching option could soon be off the market.

Shortly after MLB.com's Mark Feinsand reported that Rich Hill and the Tampa Bay Rays were "making progress toward a deal," FanSided's Robert Murray reported that the two sides had an agreement, pending a physical.

The Rays have already signed Chris Archer and Michael Wacha this offseason, but the club has lost Blake Snell and Charlie Morton, their two best starters last season.

Feb. 12, 7:07 p.m.

According to multiple reports, Jake Arrieta has agreed to a deal that would send the right-hander back to the North Side of the Windy City.

ESPN's Jesse Rogers reports that the deal is worth between $6.5-$7 million for one year.

The 34-year-old had far and away his best seasons as a Cub, as he went 68-31 with a 2.73 ERA over the course of a five-year run, winning the NL Cy Young Award in 2015 and helping Chicago end its World Series drought in 2016.

Feb. 11, 3:04 p.m.

League sources tell SNY's Andy Martino that Jake Arrieta’s market value exceeds the $6.5 million the Tampa Bay Rays recently agreed to pay Chris Archer.

Meanwhile, James Paxton is said to be seeking more than the $11 million the Yankees are paying Corey Kluber.

Paxton, despite missing most of the 2020 season due to a forearm injury, has been much more durable than Kluber recently.

The 32-year-old Paxton tossed 150.2 innings in 2019, while Kluber was limited to 35.2.

Feb. 10, 4:32 p.m.

The Mets are said to be all over the depth starting pitcher market, SNY's Andy Martino reports.

Martino reported earlier Wednesday that discussions continue between the Mets and free agent right-handed pitcher Jake Arrieta, though there was no indication a deal is close

The Mets also have "some interest" in free agent left-hander James Paxton.

Per Martino, the Mets could sign more than one of the remaining free agent starting pitchers on the market.