Kurt Suzuki finds himself in surprising spot of headline maker

Todd Dybas
NBC Sports Washington

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Kurt Suzuki will turn 37 years old while in a major-league uniform if the Nationals play October baseball again this season. This is year 14 and the second stop with one of four teams he's played for. Suzuki spent time in the American League,
 then the National League, then back to the AL before a return to the NL. He's well-traveled.

Which makes the headlines cooking with his name all the stranger to him. Following comments to The Washington Post that the Houston Astros were using a whistling system to steal signs in the 2019 World Series, Suzuki's name was hurled to the front of the cross-player sniping currently pervasive in Major League Baseball. Houston's Carlos Correa transitioned to specifically talk about Suzuki on Saturday when he rumbled through a session with Astros writers. Sunday, Suzuki conducted his own group session, something he was partly in disbelief about, and something he doesn't want to keep occurring. 

"Honestly, I'm too old to get in the middle," Suzuki said. "I really don't associate myself with this kind of stuff. I just kind of go about my business and try to stay out of everything and get ready to play baseball. That's what it's about -- playing baseball."

Suzuki's steady answers Sunday inside the Nationals' clubhouse focused on two ideas: he's enjoying the World Series and preparing for 2020. Suzuki stopped short of saying "I'm just here so I don't get fined," but that was the general tenor after he politely agreed to talk with reporters despite being self-aware enough to realize the topic.

"I thought you guys were going to talk about the 1-for-20 in the World Series," Suzuki joked.

He made the same joke with teammates before heading to meet the media. He was asked where that "one" landed.

"Train tracks."

Suzuki joined Yan Gomes, pitching coach Paul Menhart, Davey Martinez and others in devising a multi-tiered system to protect signs against the Astros in the World Series. Suzuki did not say Sunday he knew the Astros were cheating in the World Series. 

"You hear stuff around the league," Suzuki said. "All you do is you do your due diligence and you try to prepare yourself to not get into that situation. We just did our homework on our end and did everything we possibly can to combat the rumors going around and we just prepared ourselves. That was the bottom line: just getting ready for it if it did happen."

His session of diffusement ended with a nod to Max Scherzer's comments from when spring training began. Scherzer bounced back questions about the Astros by advising reporters to go talk to them. 

"That's their situation," Suzuki said. "I think Scherzer said it best. They are the ones that have to do the answering. We're just getting ready for the 2020 season to defend the title. That's it. We're getting ready, enjoying our teammates, enjoying the World Series and getting ready for the season."

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Kurt Suzuki finds himself in surprising spot of headline maker originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

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