Kevin Garnett: ‘I’ve definitely said some crazy s— to LeBron’

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As for two other legends Garnett crossed paths with, during a video call a few months later, I ask him about the difference between Michael Jordan and LeBron James. “It’s a different level of respect,” he replies. “Michael Jordan I looked at as f—— God. And I thought he was my version of what basketball looked like. And with LeBron, it was more like the little homie. Here’s the little homie growing up, and man, little homie is getting better than everybody! God damn!… I definitely talked some s— to him. I’ve definitely said some crazy s— to him. He’s definitely said some crazy s— back to me.” Garnett also praises LeBron for carrying the NBA as long as he has: “You’ve gotta have that in you to be able to have those shoulders to carry it. No man is perfect in this s—, and there ain’t no telltale book on how to do this s—. He’s done a great f—— job. I just felt like it was only right to give him that respect.”
Source: Michael Pina, Condé Nast @ GQ.com

What’s the buzz on Twitter?

Sean Highkin @highkin
At @BleacherReport: A conversation with Kevin Garnett about his new documentary and some of the ways his career influenced the modern league. He was fantastic as you’d expect bleacherreport.com/articles/29503…10:53 AM

Michael Pina @MichaelVPina
Late last year I flew to Minnesota and hung out with Kevin Garnett at his home. Needless to say it was a surreal 48-hour experience: gq.com/story/kevin-ga…9:40 AM

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