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Jimmy Kimmel hints at potential lawsuit against Aaron Rodgers

Aaron Rodgers might soon add another title to his list of individual accolades.

Defendant.

Rodgers took another shot on Tuesday at Jimmy Kimmel, suggesting that Kimmel's name might appear on the long-awaited Jeffrey Epstein client list. Kimmel fired back with a not-so-subtle threat of a defamation suit.

“There’s a lot of people, including Jimmy Kimmel, really hoping that doesn’t come out," Rodgers said regarding the Epstein client list, while appearing on Pat McAfee's show, via Michaela Zee of Variety.com.

Said Kimmel, on X: “Dear Aasshole: for the record, I’ve not met, flown with, visited, or had any contact whatsoever with Epstein, nor will you find my name on any ‘list’ other than the clearly-phony nonsense that soft-brained wackos like yourself can’t seem to distinguish from reality. Your reckless words put my family in danger. Keep it up and we will debate the facts further in court.”

The fight dates back to March, when Rodgers suggested that information regarding UFOs was released as a distraction from the Epstein client list, during an appearance with McAfee. Kimmel made fun of Rodgers for doing so.

Rodgers needs to tread lightly here. If he says Kimmel's name appears on the Epstein client list without proof, Rodgers could indeed be sued for defamation.

There's a broader business issue at play here. ESPN and ABC are commonly owned by Disney. Rodgers regularly appears on McAfee's show, which is currently an ESPN property. Rodgers reportedly is compensated more than $1 million annually for his weekly conversations. Kimmel hosts ABC's popular late-night show. Kimmel could (and frankly should) complain to the powers-that-be about ESPN giving a weekly platform to someone who would spew reckless conspiracy theories and/or tell outright lies — especially about key Disney employees.

That could prompt ESPN to tell McAfee that he needs to cut Rodgers loose. Given the significance of Rodgers to the rise of McAfee's show, would McAfee buckle? Or would it potentially blow up the relationship between McAfee and ESPN, only months after it began?