A.J. Hinch releases statement after being suspended and fired

Bill Baer

Former Astros manager A.J. Hinch has issued a statement after being suspended for one year by Major League Baseball earlier today and after the Astros subsequently dismissed him. His former colleague, Jeff Luhnow, also issued a statement. They are in direct contrast to each other. Whereas Luhnow shirked responsibility and sought to blame others, Hinch simply accepted responsibility.

Hinch’s statement, via Chandler Rome of the Houston Chronicle:

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I appreciate Commissioner Manfred’s unwavering commitment to upholding the best interests of baseball. I regret being connected to these events, am disappointed in our club’s actions within this timeline, and I accept the Commissioner’s decision.

As a leader and Major League Manager, it is my responsibility to lead players and staff with integrity that represents the game in the best possible way. While the evidence consistently showed I didn’t endorse or participate in the sign stealing practices, I failed to stop them and I am deeply sorry.

I apologize to Mr. Crane for all negative reflections this may have had on him and the Astros organization. To the fans, thank you for your continued support through this challenging time – and for this team. I apologize to all of you for our mistakes but I’m confident we will learn from it – and I personally commit to work tirelessly to ensure I do.

My time in Houston has provided some of the greatest moments in my career and those memories will always be near and dear to me and my family. I regret that my time with the Astros has ended, but will always be a supporter of the club, players, and staff I’ve had the privilege of working alongside. I wish them the best in the future of the game I love.

Indeed, Manfred’s report more or less vindicated Hinch. Manfred wrote, “Hinch told my investigators that he did not support his players decoding signs using the monitor installed near the dugout and banging the trash can, and he believed that the conduct was both wrong and distracting. Hinch attempted to signal his disapproval of the scheme by physically damaging the monitor on two occasions, necessitating its replacement.”

Just as importantly, however, Manfred said, “Hinch admits he did not stop it and he did not notify players or [Alex Cora, then the Astros’ bench coach] that he disapproved of it, even after the Red Sox were disciplined in September 2017. Similarly, he knew of and did not stop the communication of sin information from the replay review room, although he disagreed with this practice as well and specifically voiced his concerns on at least one occasion about the use of the replay phone for this purpose.”

Hinch, like many in the Astros organization, didn’t always have the best response when embroiled in a scandal, but he did well with this statement in the wake of his suspension and firing, especially when compared to Luhnow’s statement. One wonders if his apparent contrition might help him more easily find work in baseball when his suspension is over following the completion of the 2020 season.

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