Inside the Aaron Jones deal

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Mike Florio
·2 min read
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

The Packers didn’t apply the franchise tag to running back Aaron Jones. Then, Green Bay signed him to a new four-year deal. The details of the contract finally have emerged.

The four-year, $48 million contract has a $13 million signing bonus. That’s the only fully guaranteed cash in the contract. The deal includes a non-guaranteed salary of $1 million in 2021 (as a practical matter, it will be paid), along with a $200,000 in per-game roster bonuses and a $50,000 workout bonus for 2021.

In 2022, Jones has a roster bonus of $3.75 million due on the first day of the league year, along with a $1.1 million base salary, $400,000 in per-game roster bonuses, and a $500,000 workout bonus. None of the payments are guaranteed.

For 2023, a $7 million roster bonus is due on the third day of the league year, with a base salary of $8.1 million, $400,000 in per-game roster bonuses, and a $500,000 workout bonus. None of the payments are guaranteed.

In the final year of the deal, Jones gets a base salary of $11.1 million, along with $400,000 in per-game roster bonuses and a $500,000 workout bonus. None of the payments are guaranteed.

Instead of applying the franchise tag to Jones at $8.655 million this year and, if they so desired, $10.386 million in 2022 under a second tag, the Packers will pay Jones $14 million this year (and up to $250,000 in workout and per-game roster bonuses) with the ability to continue the contract in 2022, at an additional base rate of $4.875 million (and up to $900,000 in workout and per-game roster bonuses.

So it’s a one-year, $14.75 million deal and a year-to-year team-held option for 2022 and beyond. The total possible cash payout through two years becomes $20 million.

The biggest decision arrives in two years, when the Packers will be looking to $16 million for a third year. (The $7 million roster bonus forces a quick decision.)

The structure keeps with Green Bay’s typical reluctance to fully guarantee money beyond the first year of a non-quarterback deal. For the extra $6 million paid to Jones above the tag in 2021, the Packers have secured the ability to decide, one year at a time, whether to keep Jones.

Inside the Aaron Jones deal originally appeared on Pro Football Talk