Hot Stove: AJ Pollock could be the player to fill the Cubs needs

NBC Sports Chicago

Hot Stove: AJ Pollock could be the player to fill the Cubs needs originally appeared on nbcsportschicago.com

Six players turned down qualifying offers in baseball, and they are quality names in LHP Patrick Corbin, C Yasmani Grandal, OF Bryce Harper, LHP Dallas Keuchel, reliever Craig Kimbrel and OF A.J. Pollock. It's the last name that piqued the interest of Cubs Insider Tony Andracki, who told me on our Hot Stove show on Facebook Live Tuesday at 12:30, that while all eyes are on Harper, Pollock is a player who could fit the Cubs' needs. 

"The interesting name is A.J. Pollock, depending what the market is for him, because he's a guy that when he's able to stay healthy, and he hasn't really been healthy for about five years now, but when he's able to stay healthy, he's a dynamic player who would really shake up that offense, and he's also a leadoff hitter," Andracki said. "The Cubs need a stable leadoff hitter and he's a guy they could look at."

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Posted by NBC Sports Chicago on Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Pollock has played in only 469 games over the last five seasons. He played 113 in 2018, and batted .257 with 21 home runs and 65 RBI, and broke his thumb in May. His all-star season was in 2015, when he played in 157 games, hit .315, had 20 home runs and 76 RBI. Pollock turns 31 on December 5. 

If the Cubs were to sign Pollock in the current circumstances, they would have to give up their pick after Competitive Balance Round B in the June 2019 First-year player draft, and $500,000 of their international bonus pool money. Under the previous collective bargaining agreement, a team signing a player who turned down a qualifying offer would have to give up a supplemental first-round draft pick. 

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