You can help plan our history road trip to South Texas

·3 min read

Welcome back to “Think, Texas,” your free weekly digital newsletter about all things Texas past.

I hear the call of the road.

This time, "Think, Texas" is headed to South Texas.

To be more precise, the Corpus Christi area.

Sailing in Corpus Christi bay with the city skyline and downtown in the background in 1991.
Sailing in Corpus Christi bay with the city skyline and downtown in the background in 1991.

I'm already mentally loading up the SUV. I've asked four experts what to see and do. Just as importantly, where to eat.

Today's column includes an appeal to you readers for historical, cultural and gustatory tips on what to do in the Corpus Christi area.

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THE COLUMN

Texas history: We're headed to Corpus Christi: Tell us what to see, do and eat there

Soon I'll fire up the "Think, Texas" road trip machine and point it toward South Texas.

Already, I have asked some experts about which historical, cultural and gustatory sites to visit while I'm there, but please send your tips to mbarnes@statesman.com.

Specifically, I'll return to a lifelong focal point on the Gulf coast, Corpus Christi. Then I'll make day trips to the surrounding areas.

If you don't know about the digital newsletter, we've redesigned it and packed it with even more Texas trivia, stories, pictures, links and advice. You can sign up at profile.statesman.com/newsletters/manage, or at the newsletters page of your hometown USA Today Network newspaper. READ MORE

THE PODCAST

On the latest episode of "Austin Found" podcast, J.B. Hager and I chat about the new book, "Indelible Austin: Volume 4," the latest in my series of collected columns about Austin people, places, culture and history.

American-Statesman columnist Michael Barnes and Austin360 Radio personality J.B. Hager team up on "Austin Found," a podcast about how Austin became Austin.
American-Statesman columnist Michael Barnes and Austin360 Radio personality J.B. Hager team up on "Austin Found," a podcast about how Austin became Austin.

HOMETOWN HISTORY

·      From Abilene: Kiwanis 100: year-by-year review of service, fun and history

·      From Amarillo: Matthew 'Bones' Hooks an African American trailblazer

·      From Austin: In Old West Austin find an urban homestead called Flower Hill

·     From Corpus Christi: Kinney Hotel became the Caller's first home

The old Kinney House Hotel at the corner of Chaparral and William was converted into  George Noessel’s store in 1855 and then became the first home of the Corpus Christi Caller in 1883.
The old Kinney House Hotel at the corner of Chaparral and William was converted into George Noessel’s store in 1855 and then became the first home of the Corpus Christi Caller in 1883.

·      From El Paso: The ice man was vital part of El Paso history

·      From Lubbock: Needlework tools tell West Texas history

·      From San Angelo: Branhams came to Texas by covered wagon

·      From Wichita Falls: The Bicentennial Wagon Train

FUN TEXAS FACT

One of the oldest cities in Texas, Laredo founded in 1755

On May 15, 1755, Tomás Sánchez de la Barrera y Garza founded Laredo with his family and several others.

Sánchez was born near Monterrey, Nuevo León, in 1709. As a young man he served in the army and later ran a ranch in Coahuila. When José Vázquez Borrego established a ranch on the north bank of the Rio Grande in 1750, Sánchez started one on the south side within sight of the new settlement.

He was residing there in 1754, when he petitioned José de Escandón for permission to found a town on the north bank of the river. Escandón eventually approved the request and appointed Sánchez captain and chief justice of the new settlement, to be named Laredo.

Sánchez was almost singly responsible for maintaining the settlement on the north bank of the Rio Grande, and he held the offices of chief justice and alcalde with only brief intermissions until his death in January 1796.

(Texas Day by Day / Texas State Historical Association) READ MORE 

TEXAS TITLES

"The Writings of Ferdinand Lindheimer: Texas Botanist, Texas Philosopher" by John E. Williams
"The Writings of Ferdinand Lindheimer: Texas Botanist, Texas Philosopher" by John E. Williams

We recommend: "The Writings of Ferdinand Lindheimer: Texas Botanist, Texas Philosopher" by John E. Williams

Ferdinand Lindheimer was many things to Texas. One of the founders of New Braunfels, he edited the local newspaper, Neu-Braunfelser Zeitung. The "Father of Texas Botany" wrote extensively about Texas natural history and, while living essentially on the frontier, shared astute philosophy with the readers of his paper. This book is essential if you are interested in any of those things. READ MORE ON TEXAS TITLES

Thanks for reading,

Michael Barnes, Columnist

Email: mbarnes@statesman.com

Twitter: twitter.com/outandabout

This article originally appeared on Austin American-Statesman: You can help plan our road trip to South Texas