Francisco Lindor's first Mets home run a bright spot in forgettable loss: 'This one, you learn from it'

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Alex Smith
·4 min read
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Francisco Lindor smiling after first home run grey uniform
Francisco Lindor smiling after first home run grey uniform

The circumstances surrounding the rest of Wednesday’s blowout loss to the Cubs were forgettable, but Francisco Lindor provided a moment that Mets fans will be able to witness again and again for the next decade, as he blasted his first home run in a Mets uniform.

Lindor, who came into the game scuffling with just seven hits in his first 41 at-bats with the team, broke out in a big way Wednesday, going 3-for-4 with his solo home run in the top of the first inning.

“I believe I mentioned it earlier, that all it takes is one swing … to feel like I’m in a good spot. I got that one swing,” Lindor said after the game. “Then after that, I made some adjustments with [hitting coach Chili Davis], we talked and it was just a matter of seeing pitches.

“That series in Colorado I was a little bit out of rhythm. First game here, same thing. It’s gonna come, It’s gonna come. You’ve just gotta play the game and as a professional hitter make adjustments faster.”

But on a night when Lindor shined at the plate, he joined some of his teammates in having a poor night in the field. The Mets committed four errors as a team Wednesday, and one of those was charged to Lindor, as he bobble a ball up the middle and then threw it away at first base. He also had another uncharacteristic play where he and Jeff McNeil both seemed to have a shot at a ball up the middle, but both players pulled up short, allowing the ball to roll into center.

Afterwards, Lindor took full responsibility for his defense, saying he hasn’t been pleased with his play at short recently.

“This one, you learn from it. Personally, I don’t like how I’ve been playing defense the past couple days,” said Lindor. “Learn from what’s happened, learn from our mistakes, and when it comes to everybody else, I hope we all do the same thing. We learn from it, but we flush it. In baseball you’ve got to have a short-term memory. Remember the good things, remember the bad things that are going to make you better for the next time, and then flush the rest. As professional baseball players, we’ve got to make faster adjustments and I’ve got to be the first one to make the adjustments.

“The ground ball today that I made the error, after I dropped the ball, the game sped up. Catch the ball, regroup, and then everything else. The ball was a little wet, but I sped up, and that’s not good. The ground ball up the middle that me and McNeil went after and didn’t get to it, I should have communicated a little bit better and let him know if I’m gonna be outside or inside, and I probably would have caught the ball or he would have caught the ball. … I’ve got to be more and more on my toes and understanding my surroundings. As a professional baseball player, that’s all I can do.”

Wednesday night’s game was another frigid night at Wrigley Field, and it was a game the Mets would like to move on from as quick as possible, as just about nothing seemed to go their way in the 16-4 loss.

But as Lindor said, even the best teams in baseball will face tough times during the season, and the important thing is how the Mets learn from games like this one and move on as a group.

"New York, we're not trying to lose games. We're working as hard as we can every day to win ball games,” Lindor said. “But we're going to lose at least 50 games, if we win 112, that's impressive right there, so at least we're going to lose 50. So, we understand that, and we understand that we’re going to struggle. We’re going to have bad days, we’re going to have good days.

“The best baseball teams, they stay even keeled. They don’t go up, they don’t go down. They stay in the same line all year long, and when somebody’s down, the next guy picks him up to help him stay even-keeled as well. That’s something that the guys have done really, really well here. … The first two weeks of the season there has been a lot of adversity. Good teams go through those things and come out on top.”