Francisco Lindor was optimistic Mets deal would happen: 'I never drew a line in the sand'

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Danny Abriano
·3 min read
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Francisco Lindor Mets smiling during newser after signing extension
Francisco Lindor Mets smiling during newser after signing extension

As Francisco Lindor talked Thursday about the massive contract extension that could keep him with the Mets for the rest of his career, he said that he never drew a line in the sand.

And as the drama played out in public, Lindor remained optimistic a deal would get done.

"I'm very conservative with how I talk numbers to people," Lindor told reporters via Zoom. "My camp -- me and (agent) David Meter -- we keep things very, very tight. But I was very optimistic that we were gonna get a deal done. I knew Steve (Cohen) wanted it, I knew Sandy (Alderson) wanted it. I wanted it, David wanted it. So I knew something was gonna happen. It was just a matter of getting to that sweet spot.

"For them to feel comfortable and for me and my family to feel comfortable. There was numbers thrown out there, there was years thrown out there. But from my part, you never really hear every detail of the negotiation. That's not how I do things. I hope you guys understand that. The numbers that you guys see, sure, I'll say yes (they were right). But I won't go through every detail of the negotiation."

Per SNY's Andy Martino, the initial request from Lindor's camp was around $400 million.

Earlier this week, Cohen and Lindor had dinner to talk things over, which Lindor said "helped a lot."

"We got a sense of where we both were," Lindor said. "I never drew a line in the sand. The offer that was out there that people were saying -- yeah, we threw the number (out there). But that wasn't a line in the sand. It gave it a sense of where we were, to Steve, and he gave us a sense of where he was.

"He's all about winning, and I think we wanted this. Both sides are happy and we're in a good and friendly zone. I can't wait to be stuck to his hip for the next 10 years or 11 years.

Throughout the roughly 45 minutes Lindor spoke on Thursday, he talked about how comfortable he is with the Mets and in the clubhouse, his faith in himself (he said he'll still be a "bad mother effer" near the end of his deal, and how excited he is to play in front of Mets fans.

He also thanked Pete Alonso, who said earlier this week that the Mets should give Lindor $400 million.

"I thanked him, because he didn't have to go out there and say that," Lindor explained. "To say it in front of people, that's special. Takes a lot of courage. And I thanked him for that. I thanked him for his kind words, and his turn will come and he's gonna get a lot of money.

"But most importantly, not because how good he is on the field, but he's a great person. And that speaks a lot more than any award on the field."