Former Patriots offensive lineman Rich Ohrnberger credits Adam Sandler, 'The Waterboy' for kickstarting career

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Jacob Camenker
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Former Patriots draft pick thanks Adam Sandler for kickstarting career originally appeared on NBC Sports Boston

In 1998, Adam Sandler brought Bobby Boucher to life in the hit movie The Waterboy.

The comedy focused on the life of Boucher, a waterboy turned star linebacker player for the fictitious South Central Louisiana State University Mud Dogs. The underdog character is beloved by many and evidently served as an inspiration to a former member of the New England Patriots.

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In a recent tweet, Rich Ohrnberger confirmed that seeing The Waterboy convinced him to try out for his middle school football team. From there, he made it to the NFL.

That's a pretty neat story from Ohrnberger, and it's cool that he took the time to shout out Sandler's impact on his career while Sandler celebrated the 25th anniversary of the release of Happy Gilmore.

Though Ohrnberger, who was a fourth-round pick in the 2009 NFL Draft by the Patriots, played in just five games over three seasons with the Pats, the Penn State product appeared in 39 games over the course of his six-year career. He made seven starts in eight games with the Chargers in 2014 after replacing injured starting center Nick Hardwick. That marked his best and final NFL season.

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All in all, that's not a bad career, especially considering that a movie is what convinced Ohrnberger to give football a shot.

And when it's all said and done, he must've made his mama proud with how far he got.