Former NASCAR CEO Brian France pleads guilty in DWI case

Yahoo Sports Contributor
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NASCAR CEO and Chairman, Brian France reached a deal with the DA in Suffolk County over a drunk driving arrest from August. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz, FIle)
NASCAR CEO and Chairman, Brian France reached a deal with the DA in Suffolk County over a drunk driving arrest from August. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz, FIle)

NASCAR CEO Brian France pleaded guilty to DWI on Friday stemming from his arrest in the Hamptons last August, the Suffolk County District Attorney announced.

France is required to complete 100 hours of community service and attend alcohol counseling prior to a sentencing date, per Bob Pockrass of FOX Sports. He will then be able to withdraw the guilty plea and reduce it to a traffic violation of driving while ability impaired.

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Failure to meet the requirements will result in a misdemeanor conviction at his sentencing June 5, 2020. The Suffolk County District Attorney used the announcement to remind those traveling in the area “it is all of our responsibility to keep the road safe.

France, 56, and his attorney released the following statement:

“While I made a mistake, this event has also given me the opportunity to reflect on my poor judgement that day, my family and my greater responsibilities to our community,” France said in the statement. “I have learned valuable lessons and will be a better person because of this process.”

France was pulled over two hours after the first win of Chase Elliott’s career. He was charged with DWI for a blood alcohol level of .18, per the DA’s release, and possession of oxycodone, a charge that was later dropped. It was the second known traffic incident for the chairman, who hit a tree in 2006.

He took a leave of absence after the August arrest and his uncle, Jim France, has been leading NASCAR since then. Jim France and Lesa France Kennedy, Brian’s sister, are the majority owners.

NASCAR had no comment on the deal, per Pockrass.

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