Is this Elizabeth Olsen or Scarlett Johansson? Excessive airbrushing makes actress unrecognizable

Contributor
Yahoo Lifestyle
(Photo: Disney/Empire)
(Photo: Disney/Empire)

Even Elizabeth Olsen doesn’t recognize herself on the cover of Empire magazine.

The actress, who plays Scarlet Witch in the Avengers movies, took to Instagram to post the new issue. In the caption, “Does this look like me?”

April 27th… Does this look like me? #scarletwitch #infinitywar #avengers

A post shared by Elizabeth Olsen (@elizabetholsenofficial) on Mar 20, 2018 at 12:10pm PDT


For reference, this is what she usually looks like:

(Credit: WENN)
(Credit: WENN)

“It’s like they accidentally started to make you look like Scarlet Johannson and then realized whoops and then they ran out of time or something,” wrote one person in the comments. “It looks like a Madame Tussaud’s replica,” added another.

Other highlights included:

“This is horrible, what were they thinking…”

“You look weird man…”

“Nope. They really did you wrong…”

“I honestly would have thought it was a new character in the Avengers…”

Olsen isn’t the first to call out a publication for excessive retouching. In the beginning of March, Riverdale‘s Lili Reinhart took to Instagram stories to chastise Cosmo Philippines for making her and co-star Camila Mendes’s waistlines thinner. “It’s an everyday battle sometimes,” Reinhart said of accepting her body. “And to see our bodies become so distorted in an editing process is the perfect example of the obstacles we have yet to overcome.” When Lena Dunham’s figure was doctored for the cover of Spanish magazine Tentaciones she wrote of the cover image that she “also found it charming and appealing. …But in the same way I find Emily Blunt charming and appealing: she’s not me.”

While Photoshop is still widely used, there are brands that have made major statements by opting not to employ the tool. Missguided’s body positive campaign highlights — instead of hides — cellulite, stretch marks, and other “imperfections.” Then there’s CVS, which announced in January that it won’t “materially alter” any images associated with beauty products in stores, online, and on social media. 

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