Orioles' Dylan Bundy sets dubious record allowing four homers without recording an out

“ <a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="/mlb/players/9125/" data-ylk="slk:Dylan Bundy">Dylan Bundy</a> didn’t have it against the Royals” would be a bit of an understatement. (AP Photo)
Dylan Bundy didn’t have it against the Royals” would be a bit of an understatement. (AP Photo)

Dylan Bundy can breathe a sigh of relief: It’s over.

The Baltimore Orioles starting pitcher, a former top prospect who has struggled with injuries, allowed four home runs Tuesday against the Royals before being pulled without recording an out, setting some dubious history.

First, Jorge Soler cranked a two-run shot off a changeup. Then Mike Moustakas and Salvador Perez followed up for back-to-back-to-back blasts. Then, two baserunners later, Alex Gordon ended Bundy’s night with one last homer.


How did Dylan Bundy’s start play out?

Here is the simple sequence of events:

Single
Home run
Home run
Home run
Walk
Walk
Home run

OK, so how bad was Dylan Bundy’s start on a historical scale?

Not great. So not great, in fact, that Bundy’s start will go down in the history books for all the wrong reasons. Before Tuesday, no pitcher in MLB history had allowed four home runs in a game without recording an out, according to MLB.com’s Andrew Simon.

Going by game score, Bundy’s start is the worst MLB start since World War II. The only one worse was the Athletics’ Mike Oquist in August 1998, who posted a -21 score after allowing 14 earned runs to a mid-dynasty Yankees team. That’s right, this game was apparently even worse than the 12-run start that effectively ended Jeremy Guthrie’s MLB career last season.

Was Dylan Bundy at least facing a good lineup?

The Royals entered Tuesday ranked 28th out of 30 MLB teams in homers with just 29 on the season.


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