Duncan Ferguson knows he does not have the experience for Everton job right now

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Everton caretaker manager Duncan Ferguson admits he does not have the experience to currently take on the job permanently – but accepts a run of results could change that.

The former Toffees striker has been placed in charge for “upcoming games” following the sacking of Rafael Benitez last weekend.

Another ex-Everton forward Wayne Rooney, currently in charge at Derby, former Chelsea manager Frank Lampard and ex-Italy defender Fabio Cannavaro all appear to be contenders but Ferguson has the opportunity to make an impact on a temporary basis.

“Maybe down the line. One day I dream of becoming Everton manager,” he said.

“But of course I’ve not quite got that experience so my job at the moment is to take the upcoming games, steady the ship and the club will go through a process of identifying the new manager.”

When it was suggested an upturn in results – after one win in 13 matches accounted for Benitez – could change his situation, Ferguson added: “You never know in football, do you?

“At the moment my job is to focus on the next game. What happens down the line is up to the club.”

Ferguson’s previous spell as caretaker boss, when he took charge between the departure of Marco Silva and arrival of Carlo Ancelotti in 2019, saw him win one, draw two and lose one.

However, it was the spirit he engendered which endeared him to fans and the Scot admits he had to tell the squad a few “home truths” in his own inimitable style this week.

“Just what is needed from an Everton player, what the fans demand, that’s what I am banging on at them,” he added ahead of the visit of Aston Villa, managed by former Liverpool captain Steven Gerarrd.

“In the past it has not been good enough, we need to show the fans what you are all about and fight for the shirt.

“We have to show the fans we care about the club. They need to see a team fighting for them.”

Asked whether the players now understood, Ferguson said: “I think they should know, but obviously they know now – put it that way.

Duncan Ferguson on the touchline
Duncan Ferguson has been placed in charge for ‘upcoming games’ (Martin Rickett/PA)

“I have pushed them as hard as I could possibly push them, make sure we keep that intensity.

“They are determined to show their true colours but they were on the floor. When you continue to get bad results it rolls on and it is difficult to turn around.

“This week we have tried to get a bit of confidence in them, tell them a few home truths and try to get that reaction.”

Having gone through six different managers – Roberto Martinez, Ronald Koeman, Sam Allardyce, Marco Silva, Carlo Ancelotti and Benitez – it would appear Everton are no closer to identifying what philosophy they want the team to have.

The argument from fans is they have to understand the club, hence the clamour for Rooney, but Ferguson said there was one priority.

“We need a winning manager, don’t we?” said Ferguson, who has had a call from Ancelotti wishing him good luck.

“We need a manager that comes to the club and wins games of football, builds something and gets us back up the league.

“I wouldn’t want to be dragged on too many names as to who is going to be a good fit but certainly Wayne has done very well at Derby, he’s an Evertonian, the fans love him so that can be one candidate of many.

“It is important when a manager comes to a club they understand it but it is not the most important thing.

“The most important thing is the manager comes in and wins games of football, that is what it is all about.”