Draymond Green welcomes Anthony Edwards to NBA with absurd trash talk

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Marcus White
·2 min read
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Draymond welcomes Edwards to NBA in trash-talking exchange originally appeared on NBC Sports Bayarea

Draymond Green welcomed Anthony Edwards to the NBA with some trash talk, and the Minnesota Timberwolves rookie dished it right back at the Warriors star Wednesday night.

In the third quarter of Golden State's 123-111 win, Green taunted the rookie by yelling "Yes sir!" when Edwards missed a driving layup (h/t Thomas Sullivan). Edwards grabbed his own miss, sank the putback and shouted "Yes sir!" right back.

Then Green said it again. Edwards, not content with having the second-to-last word, also said it again.

Green wasn't content with missing out on the last word, either, resorting to a hilarious series of short sentences when Warriors rookie James Wiseman, the No. 2 pick in the 2020 NBA Draft behind Edwards, was called for an offensive foul on the ensuing possession.

"Yes sir! Hell yeah! Hell yeah!" Green exclaimed, followed by some additional profanity that was harder to distinguish and almost certainly not safe to publish on a Family Blog™.

Edwards' rebuttal on the next possession? A pullup 3-pointer.

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The whole exchange was a painfully relatable one for anybody, this author especially included, who takes their pickup basketball (or, recreational sports in general) a little too seriously. Even if you're getting blown out, as Edwards' Timberwolves were, you can't let derision like Green's slide!

Of course, Edwards and Green are professionals playing against and alongside some of the most hyper-competitive people on the planet, so it's a little more understandable when they do on-court mimicry than it is, say, among weekend warriors at your local YMCA or schoolyard.

Not that I'm speaking from experience, or anything.

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