Dr. J and Charles Barkley played in the last 'Wizards'-Sixers playoff series

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Last 'Wizards' vs. Sixers playoff series featured legends originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

The Wizards have advanced out of the NBA Play-In Tournament, settling them officially into the eighth-seed. It means they get to play a full, seven-game first-round series. It also means they have to play the team with the best record in the Eastern Conference, the Philadelphia 76ers.

This is, in fact, the first time in 35 years the two franchises have met in the playoffs. Washington has made the postseason 11 times since, the Sixers have gone 17 times. Not once did they cross paths.

The last time they played a playoff series was in the first round following the 1985-86 season. It was inconsequential in the big picture, as the Sixers advanced only to lose in the second round to the Milwaukee Bucks.

But it was a memorable series that went the distance, five games, and featured both all-time greats and one of the best comebacks in playoff history.

Here are five things to know about the 1986 Bullets-Sixers series...

Barkley and Dr. J were on the Sixers

The Sixers at the time were only three years removed from winning the NBA title and in the middle of a sort of clash between eras. Julius 'Dr. J' Erving was 36 and in his 14th season. He only played one more year. Charles Barkley was 22 and in his second season. He was already putting up monster numbers, but wasn't yet an All-Star.

Philly, amazingly, had six Hall of Famers. In addition to Barkley and Erving, they had Moses Malone, Bob McAdoo, Maurice Cheeks and Bobby Jones. Malone and McAdoo, however, were hurt for the series.

The Bullets had Manute Bol

While the Sixers were loaded with legends, the Bullets had one of their most popular and interesting players in franchise history in 7-foot-6 center Manute Bol. He was a rookie, just 23 years old, averaging 3.7 points, 6.0 rebounds and a preposterous 5.0 blocks per game. 

Alongside Bol, the Bullets had two-time All-Star Jeff Malone, who was one of the best guards in franchise history. They also had a few All-Stars in Jeff Ruland, Gus Williams and Dan Roundfield, plus future U.S. congressman Tom McMillen, whose grey hair did not make him look like an NBA player.

Bol had a song

Bol was such a unique player and fan favorite he got his own rap song, which debuted with a world premiere at halftime of Game 5. It was a rap song, but also featured a saxophone solo. You don't hear those very often.

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That was Pat O'Brien who introduced the song. The 80s, man.

Game 1 comeback

That series is remembered in Washington mainly for Game 1, as the Bullets came back from down 17 points with under four minutes to go. They scored 18 unanswered points to steal the win, 95-94. It was one of the biggest fourth-quarter comebacks in playoff history and about as extreme a late-game turnaround as you will see.

The Sixers, though, would win Games 2 and 3 before Washington evened up the series in Game 4. Philly would then blow out the Bullets in Game 5, which we broke down in-depth last summer as part of our 'Vault' series. Barkley, by the way, averaged 21.4 points, 17.2 rebounds, 7.2 assists and 2.0 steals in the series. Those are Russell Westbrook numbers.

Dudley Bradley's shot

The Bullets' Game 1 win was finished off by a buzzer-beating three from a player no one expected to even be on the floor, much less be the hero. Dudley Bradley, who averaged 2.8 points in 12.0 minutes per game, got the ball on the inbound pass and spun through traffic to launch a three-pointer that banked in off the glass. 

It was a remarkable play and shot. He was somehow able to calm his nerves and come through with one of the most clutch shots in Wizards/Bullets history.