Daniel Hudson represents a key offseason question for Nationals

Todd Dybas

An intact unit from a championship team is typically positive. Bring back the winners. Try it again. Why not?

The Nationals' bullpen, such as it was by the end of the season, will again be populated by pieces from the league's worst ensemble in 2019. Closer Sean Doolittle is back -- that's good. Washington picked up his $6.5 million option. To do so was a simple decision.

Also still on the 40-man roster are Roenis ElĂ­as, Hunter Strickland, Javy Guerra, Tanner Rainey and Wander Suero. Quickly, a bullpen foundation emerges. A left-handed specialist remains a need. Another power arm to pitch late is necessary. And, with the latter, is where the question about Daniel Hudson enters. 

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Hudson -- along with Howie Kendrick -- represents a core question for the World Series champions: What is repeatable?

There is a discernible need in Hudson's case. Washington has to find a way to supplement Doolittle with another closer-level reliever. Free agent options are extremely limited.

Hudson, 33, put together the second-best season of his career in 2019. The only other year which personally rivaled his 2.0-WAR output last season came in 2010. He was a very effective starter across 11 games almost a decade ago. 

His careening 2019 path falls right in line with the Nationals' own stop-and-go trajectory. Hudson was released by the Anaheim Angels on March 22. Three days later, he signed with Toronto. It traded him for right-handed minor-league pitcher Kyle Johnston, who is in Single-A, at the trade deadline. Suddenly, Hudson was en route to the playoffs as a premier part of a revamped bullpen.

He dominated after arriving: a 1.44 ERA, 0.88 WHIP and a crucial bridge during Doolittle's August injury. Hudson finished Game 7 of the World Series with a slider to strike out Michael Brantley. He pulled off his glove -- though he almost forgets the pledge he made with Doolittle to do so -- then hurled it toward the dugout before he began celebrating.

Real life often intervened for Hudson during the season. The birth of his third daughter became a national hot-take topic for a brief time and yet another embraced opportunity for proving stupidity on social media. Hudson went on the paternity list and missed Game 1 of the National League Championship Series because of the birth. A Google search of "Daniel Hudson paternity list" proves how far the story resonated. The top result is from People magazine. 

Hudson, meanwhile also adjusted to an on-field role he didn't want: being Washington's full-time, then part-time, closer put him in position to handle the ninth inning. He said late in the season, "I hate closing." Turns out he was good at it. Hudson arrived with 11 career saves. He picked up 10 more between the regular season and postseason after joining the Nationals. 

He also struck a positive note with Doolittle. 

"I want Huddy back," Doolittle told NBC Sports Washington. "I don't know how that's going to shake out. I know the market for relievers is relatively set, but I want Huddy back.

"I think it works. It was really a unique situation where you had a couple guys at the end of the day, like, we weren't super-attached to that role or that title (closer), we just wanted to win."

That's a repeatable sentiment. But, at what cost? Hudson's ERA from 2016-2018: 4.61. His ERA with the Nationals was more than three runs lower. Would Washington be paying for recency bias and sentimentality? Or can it find a price point where Hudson's return would be in line with his likeliness to revert? 

He's one player. However, he represents a key question and a key spot.

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Daniel Hudson represents a key offseason question for Nationals originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington

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